English business jargon and slang terms QUIZ – the answers!

At last, the long-awaited answers to Tuesday’s business jargon and slang quiz
Answers to business quiz

1.BHAGs

a) Business Hiring Among Graduates
b) Big Hairy Audacious Goals
c) British Hiring And Grading

B) – BHAGs (Big Hairy Audacious Goals): no doubt pronounced, as an acronym, as “bee-hags!” This is a term used to describe a goal or objective in business that is very ambitious and will make the business concerned really stretch itself, but is a goal that will inspire everyone to work hard to achieve it.

2.Bust someone’s chops

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Quiz: can you define all 25 of these business jargon and slang terms?

A quiz for you this week! Do you know what these 25 terms mean? Bet you don’t get them all right! Select the option you believe is correct…

These are taken from my forthcoming book, English Business Jargon & Slang, to be published in 2018 by Business Expert Press who have also published the US version of another of my books, How To Write Brilliant Business Blogs.

Business jargon and slang - quiz for you

Business jargon and slang in English … a whole new language?

Anyway, enough promotion already – let’s have some fun with the following…

Which terms can you define correctly? (Answers Friday)

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Local and small business advertisers: why you shouldn’t ask why not

Why not read this great article of mine? “Because I don’t want to, that’s why not.”

Often in local and small business advertising you’ll see a sentence – usually as part of the call to action – that asks “why not (try this, drop in, call for our brochure, look up our website, etc.)”

Why WHY NOT? can detract from your advertising message

You need to show that you’re 100 percent positive about what you’re selling: “why not?” can introduce an element of doubt.

Although it may seem like a polite invitation, that’s the problem: it’s too polite. [Read more…]

Business jargon and slang all the way to ZZZZ

The final part in our series on English business jargon and slang … although this is still a work in progress and is likely to be for years as more and more jargon and slang terms are devised in our business world!
Series on business jargon and slang
Under the weather: to feel under the weather means to feel unwell without any specific symptoms, or sometimes when you know what’s wrong with you but don’t want to share it with everyone else! Its origins are a little unclear, but generally seem to connect to sailors working on ships in rough seas where if they weren’t well, would be sent to the lower decks of the ship so that they were “under the weather,” so presumably they were less likely to be made sick by the rolling of the ship. There is also a theory that says the full phrase was “under the weather bow,” which is almost the opposite of the previous nautical connection: the weather bow is the part of the ship which moves and plunges the most, and if you’re under it you are like to feel unwell. All from the 20th century, though. [Read more…]

How to write a copywriting brief that gets you the results you need

There are two kinds of copywriters out there. One type will interview you and get you really thinking about your product or service offering, your target customers, and what they really want as opposed to what you think they should buy from you.

How to brief a copywriter

Make sure the briefs you give to a copywriter result in the right content.

This leads to a marketing communications brief that is bang on target and will produce an excellent result across all media. This type of copywriter tends to be experienced, skilled, very, very good at the job, but expensive.

Many SME businesses can’t or won’t pay for this level of professionalism. To quote a very-swiftly-dumped-ex-client of mine, “HOW MUCH? Just for a little bit of wording?” [Read more…]

Does your writing get invaded by the CAPITALIZERS?

Do You Capitalise Every Word In Your Titles And Headlines?

Or do you Capitalise Only the Nouns and big Words in Titles and Headlines?

Why capital letters should not be over used

Or do you, perhaps, capitalise Common Nouns as well as Proper Nouns?

OR DO YOU WRITE LONG PASSAGES ALL IN CAPITAL LETTERS THINKING THAT READERS WILL ASSUME THEY’RE IMPORTANT AND SO PAY ATTENTION?

It’s the invasion of the CAPITALIZERS!

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