HI there, business jargon … explained from H to I

Would you dare subject your “head honcho” to a “haymaker,” or would you be “in a pickle” were you to do so? More English business jargon terms and their origins – this time starting with H and I.

English Business Jargon on HTWB

Do you “have money to burn,” but find that “if you can’t stand the heat get out of the kitchen?

Hard head: someone who probably is very good at what they do, but does not take criticism lightly, or someone who is stubborn (or both!) convinced that they are right no matter what. A 20th century term. Can also mean someone who has hard convictions about their area of expertise and has every justification for being so. Finally, can refer to someone who is “hard headed” and so does not allow emotional issues to interfere with their business or otherwise strategic decisions, but who ultimately has everyone’s best interests at heart.

Hasn’t batted an eyelid: given that people who are nervous or stressed are supposed to blink frequently, this term – popularized in 20th century English language markets – refers to someone who has not shown any sign of concern, agitation, worry, excitement or other emotion because they are not blinking more often than they would in relaxed circumstances. [Read more…]

How to write in Canadian English…

If you want to annoy a Canadian, try telling them that you picked up on their American accent. That always does the trick to me even though my accent is tempered with a good few decades of British influence.

Writing in Canadian English

Writing Canadian English is not as simple as chopping it between US and UK English half-and-half…

But it’s not just the accent that’s different. (Tip: listen for the “ou” diphthong in a word like “house” … if it sounds like ha-owse  it’s American, but if it sounds like hoose  it’s Canadian. Plus, Canadians don’t whine/drone anything like as much as some Yanks do.)

Believe it or not, written Canadian English has a personality of its own

[Read more…]

Why GOOD content curation is a three-way win for you on social media

Some people might think that content curation may be a bit of an old granny in contemporary content marketing, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. Since we last spoke about content curation here on HWTB – in a brilliant article by the intrepid social media expert Cendrine Marrouat – things have moved on a bit.

I belong to a particularly sparky group of female business owners here in the UK and the other day we were having an excellent discussion about visibility, and in this instance about what to post on social media to support our own brands and credibility.

Why GOOD content creation is a great way to promote your business

Don’t slap hashtags all over your preamble. They may attract search engines, but to humans, too many look tacky.

The topic of content curation came up and met with mixed views. How do you make it work for you, when it has been written and promoted by somebody else?

First, choose the right way to curate content – not the wrong way

[Read more…]

EEEzy-FEEEzy does it for business jargon starting with E and F

Does your company’s canteen serve food that’s “finger lickin’ good,” or does it taste “fishy” and so doesn’t “fit the bill?” Enjoy these English business and general jargon terms – and their often surprising origins…

business jargon and its origins explained

I hope you don’t expect me to “foot the bill” for this “fender bender…”

English Business Jargon from E to F

[Read more…]

How to write for thought leaders’ egos

Have you noticed how some “important” thought leader types get haughtily miffed if someone suggests they need an editor or ghostwriter to help them get blog posts or articles right?

Writing for thought leaders on HTWB

No-one could possibly improve on my writing…

These days, it’s not just professional writers who are (or should be) called in to help. It also can be people like PR consultants, social media consultants, marketing or communications interns, personal/virtual assistants, and quite a few more.

So how do you cope when the ego says “no,” but the reality says “arrrgghhh!!!?”

[Read more…]

It’s D-Day for business jargon … some D-terms explained

Would you find any “dead wood” at work – and could you remove it with a “double edged sword?” And do you know why we use those terms today? Check out these Deees of business jargon!

Business jargon starting with D - explained on HTWB

Have you done a “dry run” with your “doggie bag?”

Damp squib: (sometimes said as damp squid, but as squid are sea animals they need to be damp to survive!) A squib, on the other hand, is a kind of firework and as you know, if fireworks get damp, they tend not to work properly or at all. So a “damp squib” is an occasion, activity, product, event, meeting, training course etc., that does not live up to expectations and is, basically, disappointing or even a total a failure. The first known use of the term goes back to the early 19th century in England. [Read more…]

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