J for jokes right through to M … English business jargon

Would you dare “let the cat out of the bag” or would you do better to “keep a stiff upper lip?” Or would you do some “key smashing” instead?

Business jargon by Suzan St Maur

Do you turn into a “junkyard dog” when a “johnny-come-lately” annoys you with some “jiggery-pokery?”

English business jargon from J to M

Jiggery-pokery: any slightly underhand or potentially suspicious, dishonest activity. A British term, this is said to be variant of the Scottish “joukery-pawkery” from the 19th century. [Read more…]

How to write in Canadian English…

If you want to annoy a Canadian, try telling them that you picked up on their American accent. That always does the trick to me even though my accent is tempered with a good few decades of British influence.

Writing in Canadian English

Writing Canadian English is not as simple as chopping it between US and UK English half-and-half…

But it’s not just the accent that’s different. (Tip: listen for the “ou” diphthong in a word like “house” … if it sounds like ha-owse  it’s American, but if it sounds like hoose  it’s Canadian. Plus, Canadians don’t whine/drone anything like as much as some Yanks do.)

Believe it or not, written Canadian English has a personality of its own

[Read more…]

English: and you thought you knew how to speak it? Hah!

Could you…

1.Receive a stiffie in Stamford, Lincolnshire?

2.Buy some broadloom in Bradford, Yorkshire?

3.Get gazumped in Galveston, Texas?

4.Eat arugula in Aberdeen, Scotland?

5.Go to the carsey in Cleveland, Ohio?

6.Get your bangs trimmed in Belfast, northern Ireland?

(Answers below!)

This handy A to Z brings you bang up to date on over 2,000 commonly used English words that can cause confusion, chaos, red faces and even cost you money if you use them in the wrong way, in the wrong country … especially for business and social purposes. Perfect when you want to…

  • Avoid those horribly embarrassing social gaffes
  • Stay clear of potentially costly business term goofs
  • Understand what people really mean, wherever you are
  • Catch up with basic slang from Canada and Australia as well as UK-USA
  • Understand regional slang and jargon in parts of the USA and UK

Whatever your international English needs and wants, stick this guide in your pocket, briefcase or on your favourite electronic device … and avoid ever making embarrassing goofs in this complex language of ours, ever again.

“An invaluable guide to possible, indeed probable pitfalls” – says Jonathon Green, ‘The most-acclaimed British lexicographer since Johnson’ (The Independent).

Grab your copy now:

Print: Amazon.co.uk here, Amazon.com here, Amazon.ca here

Kindle: Amazon.co.uk here, Amazon.com here

It’s a great gift idea … if you can bring yourself to part with it! (Tip: buy two.)

*Answers: (1.Yes, a stiffie is a formal invitation card. 2.Yes, as long as you called it fitted carpet.3.Possibly: gazumping is a real estate term. 4.Yes, provided you asked for rocket (salad.) 5.Yes, as long as you want to go to the washroom. 6.Yes, but you’d need to ask them to trim your fringe.
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