Get your business jargon and slang down to a TTTTTT…

You may know what most of these terms mean, but their origins are often very surprising. Here is the penultimate in this series, all starting with the popular letter “T…”

One in a series of articles on business jargon and slang

Does a “thought shower” allow you to “talk turkey” and “toe the line” about “the blue economy?”

Take pot luck: (or take potluck) is usually thought to be related to the US meaning, dating back to the late 19th century, where a large meal consists of individual edible contributions from all the guests. However the term goes back farther in time, to Britain in the 16th century, when to take pot luck meant to take your chances on what you get. Interestingly, both meanings of the term are still in use.

Take something with a grain/pinch of salt: to accept something for what it appears to be, but with some reservations as to its accuracy! This term comes from the days when much food was rather tasteless and in many cases might have been poisoned. The idea was that if you were to take such food with a “grain of salt,” or a “pinch of salt,” it made it easier to swallow. The first known reference to this goes back nearly two thousand years when Pliny wrote about it (“grain of salt”) in Naturalis Historia, back in 77 A.D. The term (also as “grain of salt”) was popular in England from the 16th century in examples like John Trapp’s Commentary on the Old and New Testaments, in 1647, and F. R. Cowell (“pinch of salt”) in Cicero & the Roman Republic, in 1948. The amount of salt concerned with a “pinch” is obvious, and a “grain” is roughly .065 of a modern day gram. [Read more…]

N O – or rather, yes! English business jargon starting with N and O

Are you the sort of person who would take a “no brainer” “on a go forward basis?” Or would you “nuke” the idea and say “not on my watch?” More business and general English jargon, this time from N to O.

More English business jargon demystified on HTWB - this time from N to O

It’s “not rocket science” to be “on the ball” if you wear an “old school tie…”

English business jargon starting with N to O

[Read more…]

J for jokes right through to M … English business jargon

Would you dare “let the cat out of the bag” or would you do better to “keep a stiff upper lip?” Or would you do some “key smashing” instead?

Business jargon by Suzan St Maur

Do you turn into a “junkyard dog” when a “johnny-come-lately” annoys you with some “jiggery-pokery?”

English business jargon from J to M

Jiggery-pokery: any slightly underhand or potentially suspicious, dishonest activity. A British term, this is said to be variant of the Scottish “joukery-pawkery” from the 19th century. [Read more…]

20 Business Terms Explained for Non-Native English Speakers, PART 2

Welcome to Part 2 of this series on business terms explained for non-native English speakers, and here is another collection of 20 common words and phrases you’re likely to see in business and business studies.

(You will find direct links to the other articles in the series by scrolling down to the bottom of this article.)

HTWB E2L June 1-16 Here’s your 2nd set of 20 business terms to help you write better in English

Benchmark: comes from the engineering industry. It means a definite, reliable point from which to measure the growth or progress of a project or activity. [Read more…]

20 Common Business Terms Explained for Non-Native English Speakers, PART 1

English is hard enough if it’s not your first language … and its business jargon is even harder. In this series we look at some of the most commonly used terms and what they really mean … in plain English.

(For direct links to the other articles in this series, scroll down to the bottom of this article.)

Jargon

Want to write better for business in English? Here’s how

Analytics: a relatively new word for statistics. Usually refers to the statistics you get from systems that measure things like your website traffic, sales, clicks, etc [Read more…]

10 popular business buzzwords we love to hate

We all say we love to hate business buzzwords, clichés and jargon, but do we actually know why  we love to hate them?

10 popular business buzzwords we love to hate After all, words and phrases only become clichés because they are used a lot. Ostensibly, they fill a need to express a common thought we are all sharing at around the same time, so they actually they are useful.

However after a while some of them become toxic. And here are some thoughts about why that should be, in no particular order. For example… [Read more…]

css.php