Business jargon C words – no, not THAT one…

Would you “cock a snook” at a “cup of joe” and just “chill out?” And would you know where those terms originate? Find out the fascinating roots of our favorite business and other jargon here…

business jargon explained on HTWB

Should you “chew out” someone who cries “crocodile tears?”

C-Suite: this is an affectionate slang term for the senior directors/vice presidents and other top people in an organisation and, presumably, where their offices are located! It’s said to originate from the fact that many of the senior job titles in a company start with the letter “C” – e.g. Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, Chief Technical Officer, Chief Operating Officer, Chief Information Officer, etc.

Can’t make head nor tail of it: (also can’t make head or tail of it) means you can’t understand something at all, and/or you find it horribly confusing. Apparently the Roman politician Cicero once wrote “Ne caput nec pedes” (neither head nor feet) when he was confused about something. More recently (from about the second half of the 17th century) people began using the term closer to its present form, but no-one is sure why we refer to “head nor tail.” Logically though, this must mean top/bottom, beginning/end, or of course two sides of the same coin. [Read more…]

20 further business terms for non-native English speakers – PART 5

Welcome to Part Five of this series on common metaphorical and other business terms in English, and what they mean – in plain English!

(For direct links to the other articles in the series, scroll down to the end of this article.)

Business terms for non-native English speakers, Part 5

English is the world’s main business language, but some words and phrases are hard to understand if you’re not a native English speaker. This series of articles will help you with the more difficult ones.

Here’s more help to write better for business in English, with 20 popular terms:

[Read more…]

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