What can I blog about today? 15 ideas to inspire you

small__3439448703Thinking up ideas for new business blog posts can be hard, especially if you haven’t yet had time to attend one of my workshops to open your mind up to new and inspired blogging inspiration! So in the meantime, here are some generic ideas that will help trigger your inspiration about your own particular product or service, and get you blogging into new and profitable dimensions… [Read more…]

How to get good new ideas for your business

Many people imagine that good ideas appear by magic, like those cartoon lightbulbs that switch themselves on over a character’s head with a caption that reads “Eureka!”

Okay, inspiration can happen spontaneously. But what most people don’t realise is that there are thought processes and mind-triggers you can use to feed and nurture your imagination … ways to ensure you spot opportunities and make sure that inspiration happens.

This is a long article (updated and condensed from a series of articles I posted last year) so be prepared – and do feel free to print it out to read at your leisure later. It represents quite a few years of finding out what doesn’t work, the hard way, and finding out what does work for me and for all the people I coach in business. So it’s worth the wait and the long read!

In the case of many, many businesses and non-business activities, creative inspiration comes about through method – not madness.

Nowhere does this apply more vigorously than in my own background as an advertising copywriter. In that business, you need to have good ideas on demand. Multi-million spend advertising clients do not expect to wait around until light bulbs switch on over the “creatives'” heads. Ideas, and damned good ones, are required on schedule. It’s “I want a new campaign by Monday morning – or else.” Happily you’re unlikely to find yourself under this kind of pressure, which in some ways is a shame … it’s surprising how well that pressure can work!

Opportunity spotting

A key trigger for creative inspiration is opportunity spotting.

Think Dyson vacuum cleaners: paper bags were fiddly, dirty to handle and tended to break. Solution? Bagless vacuum cleaner.

Think no-frills airlines: all this paraphernalia of fancy meals, drinks, snacks and lavish pampering by a large group of grinning cabin crew was a hangover not only from 1950s and 1960s commercial air travel, but also from ocean liner travel even before that. It made modern air travel too expensive. Solution? Get rid of all but the essentials and make airfares more affordable.

Think sushi bars: people – especially in the USA – grew to love Japanese food, and hey presto, it just so happened that it could be made quickly and theatrically. Solution? Combine the concept of that with the popular fast-food culture.

– and so-on. The people behind these good ideas followed processes to gain inspiration and use it profitably – from entrepreneurs to engineers, from scientists to artists, from writers to inventors.

There is the potential for expensive mistakes here, though…

Avoid solutions that are looking for problems

The sadly pot-holed roads of many developing countries could be repaired and paved successfully with solutions to problems that don’t add up to a row of beans in real life.

For an example of how that works we should look at the IT industry in the 1970s and 1980s. This was in the era when techies swanned about in white coats working in air-conditioned buildings closed to anyone without a PhD in wizardry. They were paid to come up with great ideas for magic boxes which would then be sent over to the sales and marketing wallahs with a message saying, “here’s an M-9-24 Version X. It does this, this, and this. Now go and sell it.”

In those days when most of us were in awe of technology, the method worked; businesses and other organisations didn’t have very much at all in terms of information technology to make things run more efficiently so in a sense, anything was better than nothing. However once IT had become more common, customers became increasingly picky until one day the MD or CEO of some relatively important organisation turned around to their IT suppliers and said, “I don’t care how the box works or how many gadgets it has; what will it do to improve my bottom line? And I want the damned thing to speak English, not computer gibberish, so you had better translate all that cr*p that appears on the screens. I want to understand what it’s achieving for us, and pronto.”

Customer focus: a new concept for many

Shock, horror!  For the first time in history, the IT industry was obliged to become “customer-focused.” No longer could the IT giants of the era come up with magic boxes that achieved what their engineers thought was a cool performance and then expect their customers to find something useful to do with them. No longer would customers buy solutions that were looking for problems.  And those of you who are old enough to remember the way the IT industry went through a throat-grabbing culture change in and around the 1980s will know what – and who – I’m talking about.

I think it’s a cruel truth to say that no matter how good you think your idea is, you need to conduct some sort of reality check before developing it beyond a single thought. Some people worry that if they discuss their ideas openly someone else might steal it and do it themselves. Sadly this is true; it happens. That’s a hard fact of life and we have to get over it. But 99 percent of the time your ideas will not get pinched and even if they do, whoever pinches them won’t have your unique expertise and slant on the subject. A reality check conducted with people whose views you trust and respect is only a very small risk, and it’s well worth taking.

Brainstorming

Brainstorming has been around as a quick-fix way to generate ideas for a long time now, and even has been teleported into the hi-tech age with such methodology as Tony Buzan’s “Mind Mapping.” Both hand-written and electronically generated spider charts and various other systems have been developed which formalize what many people had been doing for decades anyway, which basically involved doodling on a piece of paper.

Verbal brainstorming is popular, too, especially in its form of “think tanks” and “retreats” often used by corporations and other organizations to whip their people up into a frenzy of new ideas that ultimately will benefit the organization, and – we assume – the recipients of its services.

Whatever method suits you, beware of brainstorming for new ideas when the ground rules have not been set properly, though. I remember being asked to attend a brainstorming session for a very large chain of estate agencies (real estate brokers) some years ago. They had developed various new, hi-tech methods which bypassed many of the traditional ways of buying and selling homes and as such wanted to promote their uniqueness in a video. I was brought in by the production company to attend as the writer/producer and help them develop their thoughts.

After a very early start and a long drive I arrived at their offices in one of England’s loveliest northern cities, to find the group of company staff looking slightly haggard and worn after two hours’ debate over the bacon rolls and coffee. I was presented with a long list of reasons why their service was better than everyone else’s. Not wishing to wee-wee on their bonfire but also not wishing to spend the following two days there, I said, “OK, that’s great. But what is it we’re really doing here, with all these features that make the process easier?”

Blank looks all around.

“Isn’t it that we’re taking the stress out of buying and selling your home?”

Blank looks. Followed by smiles. And what had I done? Merely turned around that hairy old chestnut of features versus benefits. Now, because we were no longer looking at features, we could come up with ideas that were benefit-led and therefore far more likely to grab our audience.

Brainstorming is great – provided you set it up right. Remember, what we don’t need is solutions looking for problems.

What problems need to be solved?

Having warned you about the dangers of solutions looking for problems, whatever you do, don’t assume there aren’t any problems to solve. There are plenty. What you need to do, though, in your search for a good idea, is to ensure that you keep your eyes open for real problems in your particular market or topic area, and keep aware of what’s missing from whatever options there are currently to solve those problems.

Time, probably, is on your side. Solutions put forward to problems 10 or even 5 years ago, may no longer be appropriate and may indeed have been superseded by better solutions. Your solution might be even better still.

What are you really good at?

This may seem obvious, but have you really thought the uniqueness of your idea through? You know all there is to know about your topic, but in all fairness there may be other experts out there who are in the same position.

What is unique about you, though, is what will sell your idea. You may not even be aware that your ideas on your topic are unique, but hey – have a look back through your earlier musings, notes, essays, articles, papers, speeches, presentations, advertising, press releases, etc. I’d put money on the fact that you have a unique take on your topic. Find it, develop it, and make it happen.

Be nosey

If you have even the inkling of an idea, don’t be shy. Get out there and try it out. Ask around. You have a great deal to gain by sniffing out whatever sources you can to seek out to see whether your idea – or your germ of an idea – is worth taking further. Look for problems, in your area of expertise, that need solving – really need solving. Those can appear when you least expect it, so be vigilant. And keep asking around!

Watch your topic

This may seem glaringly obvious, but once you have an idea you need to watch very carefully to see what is being discussed about that particular topic. Or, should your idea be moving into uncharted waters, you need to keep abreast of everything that might be relevant.

Online resources

Google Alerts are a very useful tool that can help you keep up with your topic all over the world. You simply set up however many words or phrases relevant to your topic that you want, and Google will email you whenever they are mentioned on the internet. It’s a free service, too. Obviously you need to be fairly precise in what words or phrases you search for, if you don’t want to receive a lot of irrelevant stuff along with the good bits.

Another helpful tool is the Google Keyword Tool. This is intended to help advertisers find out which key words and phrases, relevant to their product or service, are being searched for on Google, and in which volumes. It can be useful when checking out an idea, as well, because the results will give you an indication of overall interest in that idea or topic.

Of course, the whole of Google and other search engines are available to you and it’s well worth monitoring your topic or idea on a weekly or monthly basis while you’re developing it.

Cuttings

Cutting articles out of newspapers and magazines may seem like a rather charmingly old fashioned thing to do these days, but it’s amazing how many people still do it whenever they read something that either triggers an idea, or adds substance to an idea they are already playing around with.

In fact it’s probably worth packing a small pair of scissors in your briefcase or bag when you’re out and about, to make the process easier than tearing! (Avoid taking them in your hand luggage when you’re flying, though, or the security people may think you want to stab the pilot…) You never know when you’ll see an article that you want to keep hold of – it’s just as likely to be while reading the paper on a train, or a magazine in the dentist’s waiting room, as it is when you have deliberately set out to research something.

Needless to say you can get reasonable results from searching online versions of national and local newspapers, magazines, etc., then creating a “cuttings file” on your computer. However bear in mind that the contents of online and offline versions of publications are not always the same, and online versions often tend to be shorter and less detailed.

Protecting your idea

There is a very short and not very pleasant answer here: you can’t. You can copyright titles, texts, poems, novels, etc., and you can trademark a logo or product name, but until an idea is expressed and recorded in some considerable detail you can’t stop somebody else developing and exploiting it, or at least something very similar to it.

Once upon a time – at around the time that food intolerances became fashionable – I came up with a nifty idea to develop a range of dairy-free and gluten-free food products. Like a good citizen I consulted my friendly local Business Link advisor who said, “great idea, forget it.” When I asked why he said, “because your potential distributors, like supermarkets, will sit back and watch while you spend a fortune on developing the products, get a few samples from you, make the products themselves with small differences in names and ingredients, and then tell you  to **** off.”

What a coincidence…

Another time I came up with an idea for a documentary series for one of the main TV channels in the UK. I made four consecutive presentations to so-called “commissioning editors” (who turned out afterwards to have been freelance, independent producers) who liked the idea very much. Then I heard nothing. 12 months later the channel aired a series using not only my idea, but even my title … the only thing they had changed was whereas I had suggested featuring three men and three women, they had six women. Although I had what seemed like a valid case, I was advised that should I try to take legal action they would mess me around with their expensive lawyers until I ran out of money.

On the one hand you want to run your idea past sufficient people whose opinions you value, and this is a very important part of your development and refinement processes. On the other hand, though, you don’t want to talk about your idea in a busy pub, bar, restaurant or even bus or train, because you never know who might be listening.

And even if you write up your idea in some detail, it won’t necessarily be enough to prove it’s yours in a court of law. When I had my run-in with that TV channel (see above) my idea ran to a 20 page proposal with skeleton scripts of each episode and a full production and post-production budget. Yet my legal advice was still to forget it because I was “the little guy.” As I didn’t see myself as the next Erin Brockovitch, I put my hands up.

Essentially, the only real protection you can get is if your idea could only possibly be developed and written by you … and that anyone else couldn’t do it successfully without you.

Cherish your ideas

Finally, never discard an idea which you like, even if – on researching it – you find there isn’t a market for it. There may not be a market for it at the time, but this can and often does change.

As I write this, I have three other book concepts in negotiations with publishers. One is 15 years old, the second is 9 years old, and the third is 4 years old. The first two are novels and neither tickled any publishers’ fancies when I first came up with them, but now I have a publisher wanting to do both. Their concepts – the ideas behind them – have become fashionable.  And this can be true of anything from a work of fiction to a new type of can opener.

Keep your ideas in an actual or virtual folder, in a nice safe place, and keep looking back through it. Not only can an old, undeveloped idea suddenly become flavor of the month, but also old ideas can often trigger new ones.

Get some more good ideas:

“How To Write About Yourself”…how to make the most of yourself, whatever you need to write

“Business Writing Made Easy”…everything you need to know about writing for business in English

Copyright: you can’t lock up your ideas

Can you protect your ideas for blogs, books, etc.?

Copyright: you can't lock up your ideasThere is a very short and not very pleasant answer here: you can’t. You can copyright titles, texts, poems, novels, etc., and you can trademark a logo or name, but until an idea is expressed and recorded in some considerable detail you can’t stop somebody else developing and exploiting it, or at least something very similar to it.

Once upon a time – at around the time that food intolerances became fashionable – I came up with a nifty idea to develop a range of dairy-free and gluten-free food products. Like a good citizen I consulted my friendly local Business Link advisor who said, “great idea, forget it.”

When I asked why he said, “because your potential distributors, like supermarkets, will sit back and watch while you spend a fortune on developing the products, get a few samples from you, make the products themselves with small differences in names and ingredients, and then tell you to **** off.”

Another time I came up with an idea for a documentary series for one of the main TV channels in the UK. I made four consecutive presentations to so-called “commissioning editors” (who turned out afterwards to have been freelance, independent producers) who liked the idea very much. Then I heard nothing.

12 months later the channel aired a series using not only my idea, but even my title … the only thing they had changed was whereas I had suggested featuring three men and three women, they had six women. Although I had what seemed like a valid case, I was advised that should I try to take legal action they would mess me around with their expensive lawyers until I ran out of money.

It’s a dog-eat-dog world out there

It’s often a case of striking a balance. On the one hand you want to run your idea past sufficient people whose opinions you value, and this is a very important part of your development and refinement processes. On the other hand, though, you don’t want to talk about your idea in a busy pub, bar, restaurant or even bus or train, because you never know who might be listening.

And even if you write up your idea in some detail, it won’t necessarily be enough to prove it’s yours in a court of law. When I had my run-in with that TV channel (see above) my idea ran to a 20 page proposal with skeleton scripts of each episode and a full production and post-production budget.

Essentially, the only real protection you can get is if your idea could only possibly be developed and written by you … and that anyone else couldn’t do it successfully without you.

So … use your uniqueness!

And if you have any tips on how writers and other “creatives” can protect their ideas, please share them – they will be very gratefully received!

Writing advice that helps you win:

“Super Speeches”…how to write and deliver them well

“Business Writing Made Easy…everything you need to know about writing for business in English

“How To Write Winning Non-fiction”…all you need to know to write a good non-fiction book and get it published

photo credit: Darwin Bell via photopin cc

How to get good ideas for your business blog: be a resource squirrel

Being a bit of a squirrel and gathering research fodder to take back into your nest is a very useful way to breed and develop ideas for blog posts that will work really well. Here as just a few ideas to help you squirrel away some useful information…

Online

Google Alerts are very useful tools that can help you keep up with your topic all over the world. You simply set up however many words or phrases relevant to your topic that you want, and Google will email you whenever they are mentioned on the internet. It’s a free service, too. Obviously you need to be fairly precise in what words or phrases you search for, if you don’t want to receive a lot of irrelevant stuff along with the good bits.

Another helpful tool is Google Keywords. This is intended to help advertisers find out which key words and phrases, relevant to their product or service, are being searched for on Google, and in which volumes. It can be useful when checking out an idea, as well, because the results will give you an indication of overall interest in that idea or topic.

Of course, the whole of Google and other search engines are available to you and it’s well worth monitoring your topic or idea on a weekly or monthly basis while you’re developing it.

Cuttings

Cutting articles out of newspapers and magazines may seem like a rather charmingly old fashioned thing to do these days. But it’s amazing how many people still find it a valuable thing to do whenever they read something that either triggers an idea, or adds substance to an idea they are already playing around with. And in any case, “cuttings” today can mean literal cuttings from paper papers, or simply cutting and pasting articles from the newspapers’ online personae.

In fact it’s probably worth packing a small pair of scissors in your briefcase or bag when you’re out and about, to make the process easier than tearing! (Avoid taking them in your hand luggage when you’re flying, though, or the security people may think you want to stab the pilot…) You never know when you’ll see an article that you want to keep hold of – it’s just as likely to be while reading the paper on a train, or a magazine in the dentist’s waiting room, as it is when you have deliberately set out to research something.

Needless to say you can get reasonable results from searching online versions of national and local newspapers, magazines, etc., then creating a “cuttings file” on your computer. However bear in mind that the contents of online and offline versions of publications are not always the same, and online versions often tend to be shorter and less detailed.

Cherish your ideas

Finally, never discard an idea which you like, even if – on researching it – you find there isn’t a market for it. There may not be a market for it at the time, but this can and often does change.

As I write this, I have three other book concepts in negotiations with publishers. One is 15 years old, the second is 9 years old, and the third is 4 years old. The first two are novels and neither tickled any publishers’ fancies when I first came up with them, but now I have a publisher wanting to do both. Their concepts – the ideas behind them – have become fashionable.  And this can be true of anything from a work of fiction to a new type of can opener.

As far as your blog is concerned, keep your ideas in an actual or virtual folder, in a nice safe place, and keep looking back through it. Not only can an old, undeveloped idea suddenly become flavour of the month, but also old ideas can often trigger new ones.

Now, let’s get you writing that business blog – beautifully:

“How To Write About Yourself”…how to make the most of yourself, whatever you need to write

“Business Writing Made Easy”…everything you need to know about writing for business in English

“Banana Skin Words and how not to slip on them”…over 1,500 spelling and grammar tips to perfect your written English

How to get good ideas for your business blog: lessons from industry

Many people imagine that good ideas for a business blog post appear by magic, like those cartoon lightbulbs that switch themselves on over a character’s head with a caption that reads “Eureka!” The bad news is, they don’t; the good news is, there are ways of generating enough electricity to light up that bulb yourself!

Okay, inspiration can happen spontaneously. But what most people don’t realise is that there are thought processes and mind-triggers you can use to feed and nurture your imagination … ways to ensure you spot opportunities and make sure that inspiration happens. In the case of many, many businesses and non-business activities, creative inspiration comes about through method – not madness.

Nowhere does this apply more vigorously than in my own background as an advertising copywriter. In that business, you need to have good ideas on demand. Multi-million spend advertising clients do not expect to wait around until light bulbs switch on over the “creatives'” heads. Ideas, and damned good ones, are required on schedule. It’s “I want a new campaign by Monday morning – or else.” Happily you’re unlikely to find yourself under this kind of pressure, which in some ways is a shame … it’s surprising how well that pressure can work!

Opportunity spotting

A key trigger for creative inspiration is opportunity spotting – to see where there are gaps in your readers’ knowledge about your topic, your niche, etc. and fill them with inspired new thinking. Let’s look at some examples in the business world…

Think Dyson vacuum cleaners: paper bags were fiddly, dirty to handle and tended to break. Solution? Bagless vacuum cleaner.

Think no-frills airlines: all this paraphernalia of fancy meals, drinks, snacks and lavish pampering by a large group of grinning cabin crew was a hangover not only from 1950s and 1960s commercial air travel, but also from ocean liner travel even before that. It made modern air travel too expensive. Solution? Get rid of all but the essentials and make airfares more affordable.

Think sushi bars: people – especially in the USA – grew to love Japanese food, and hey presto, it just so happened that it could be made quickly and theatrically. Solution? Combine the concept of that entertainment element with the popular fast-food culture.

– and so-on. The people behind these good ideas followed processes to gain inspiration and use it profitably – from entrepreneurs to engineers, from scientists to artists, from writers to inventors.

There is the potential for expensive mistakes here, though:

Avoid solutions that are looking for problems

The sadly pot-holed roads of many developing countries could be repaired and paved successfully with solutions to problems that don’t add up to a row of beans in real life. In your blog you want to grab readers’ attention by addressing an issue or problem they know they have – not have to persuade they have a problem in the first place.

For an example of how that works we should look at the IT industry in the 1970s and 1980s. This was in the era when techies swanned about in white coats working in air-conditioned buildings closed to anyone without a PhD in wizardry. They were paid to come up with great ideas for magic boxes which would then be sent over to the sales and marketing wallahs with a message saying, “here’s an M-9-24 Version X. It does this, this, and this. Now go and sell it.”

In those days when most of us were in awe of technology, the method worked; businesses and other organisations didn’t have very much at all in terms of information technology to make things run more efficiently so in a sense, anything was better than nothing. However once IT had become more common, customers became increasingly picky until one day the MD or CEO of some relatively important organisation turned around to their IT suppliers and said this:

“I don’t care how the box works or how many gadgets it has; what will it do to improve my bottom line? And I want the damned thing to speak English, not computer gibberish, so you had better translate all that cr*p that appears on the screens. I want to understand what it’s achieving for us, and pronto.”

Shock, horror!  For the first time in history, the IT industry was obliged to become “customer-focused.” No longer could the IT giants of the era come up with magic boxes that achieved what their engineers thought was a cool performance and then expect their customers to find something useful to do with them. No longer would customers buy solutions that were looking for problems.  And those of you who are old enough to remember the way the IT industry went through a throat-grabbing culture change in and around the 1980s will know what – and who – I’m talking about.

Reality checks – worth their weight in gold

I think it’s a cruel truth to say that no matter how good you think your idea is, you need to conduct some sort of reality check before developing it beyond a single thought. Some people worry that if they discuss their ideas openly someone else might steal it and do it themselves. Sadly this is true; it happens. That’s a hard fact of life and we have to get over it. But 99 percent of the time your ideas will not get pinched and even if they do, whoever pinches them won’t have your unique expertise and slant on the subject.

A reality check conducted with people whose views you trust and respect is only a very small risk, and it’s well worth taking. It doesn’t have to be a major research exercise, either; all it might take is a question to your closest Google Plus circle or Facebook group, to find out if they think you blog idea will be of interest. Good luck!

Now, let’s get you writing that business blog – beautifully:

“How To Write About Yourself”…how to make the most of yourself, whatever you need to write

“Business Writing Made Easy”…everything you need to know about writing for business in English

“Banana Skin Words and how not to slip on them”…over 1,500 spelling and grammar tips to perfect your written English

How to get good ideas for your business blog: brains and noses

Business blogging can be a very lonely exercise when you’re trying to come up with fresh content on a daily or almost daily business and brainstorming is one way to speed up the flow of ideas.

The brainstorming technique has been around as a quick-fix way to generate ideas for a long time now, and even has been teleported into the hi-tech age with such methodology as Tony Buzan’s “Mind Mapping.”

Both hand-written and electronically generated spider charts plus various other systems have been developed which formalize what many people had been doing for decades anyway, which basically involved doodling on a piece of paper.

Verbal brainstorming is popular, too, especially in its form of “think tanks” and “retreats” often used by corporations and other organizations to whip their people up into a frenzy of new ideas that ultimately will benefit the organization, and – we assume – the recipients of its services. Whatever method suits you, beware of brainstorming for new ideas when the ground rules have not been set properly, though.

Brainstorming thunderstorm

I remember being asked to attend a brainstorming session for a very large chain of estate agencies (real estate brokers) some years ago. They had developed various new, hi-tech methods which bypassed many of the traditional ways of buying and selling homes and as such wanted to promote their uniqueness in a video. I was brought in by the production company to attend as the writer/producer and help them develop their thoughts.

After a very early start and a long drive I arrived at their offices in one of England’s loveliest northern cities, to find the group of company staff looking slightly haggard and worn after two hours’ debate over the bacon rolls and coffee. I was presented with a long list of reasons why their service was better than everyone else’s. Not wishing to wee-wee on their bonfire but also not wishing to spend the following two days there, I said, “OK, that’s great. But what is it we’re really doing here, with all these features that make the process easier?”

Blank looks all around.

“Isn’t it that we’re taking the stress out of buying and selling your home?”

More blank looks. Followed by smiles. And what had I done? Merely turned around that hairy old chestnut of features versus benefits. Now, because we were no longer looking at features, we could come up with ideas that were benefit-led and therefore far more likely to grab our audience.

Brainstorming is great – provided you set it up right. Remember, what we don’t need is solutions looking for problems.

What problems need to be solved?

Having warned you about the dangers of solutions looking for problems, whatever you do, don’t assume there aren’t any problems to solve. There are plenty. What you need to do, though, in your search for a good idea, is to ensure that you keep your eyes open for real problems in your particular market or topic area, and keep aware of what’s missing from whatever options there are currently to solve those problems.

Time, probably, is on your side. Solutions put forward to problems 10 or even 5 years ago, may no longer be appropriate and may indeed have been superseded by better solutions. Your solution might be even better still.

What are you really good at?

This may seem obvious, but have you really thought the uniqueness of your idea through? You know all there is to know about your topic, but in all fairness there may be other experts out there who are in the same position.

What is unique about you, though, is what will sell your idea. You may not even be aware that your ideas on your topic are unique, but hey – have a look back through your earlier musings, notes, essays, articles, papers, speeches, presentations, advertising, press releases, etc. I’d put money on the fact that you have a unique take on your topic. Find it, develop it, and make it happen.

Be nosey

If you have even the inkling of an idea, don’t be shy. Get out there and try it out. Ask around. You have a great deal to gain by sniffing out whatever sources you can to seek out to see whether your idea – or your germ of an idea – is worth taking further. Look for problems, in your area of expertise, that need solving – really need solving. Those can appear when you least expect it, so be vigilant. And keep asking around!

Watch your topic

This may seem glaringly obvious, but once you have an idea you need to watch very carefully to see what is being discussed about that particular topic. Or, should your idea be moving into uncharted waters, you need to keep abreast of everything that might be relevant.

So keep your eyes open!

Now, let’s get you writing that business blog – beautifully:

“How To Write About Yourself”…how to make the most of yourself, whatever you need to write

“Business Writing Made Easy”…everything you need to know about writing for business in English

“Banana Skin Words and how not to slip on them”…over 1,500 spelling and grammar tips to perfect your written English

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