Studying English at Uni? Grab these hot writing tips from a graduate!

by Yasmin Mattocks

Anyone out there lucky enough to be starting university life as an English undergraduate?

As a recent English literature graduate, I am now looking back fondly on my 3 years, realising that there were some very important things that had I known, would have helped me from the start.

writing tips for English undergraduates

Getting behind on your reading is not a position you want to be in.

It is likely that you’re a competent writer if you’re going on to study English at university, but the leap from A-level to university can be daunting. Firstly, getting out of the Point, Context, Quotation, Analysis mindset can be a struggle, and then where are you supposed to go from there?

Worry no more: I’m here to pass on some top tips for studying English at university. [Read more…]

Why ‘doing it’ can still be fun

Another hilarious poem written by retired GP / family doctor Andrea Kingston, who is fast becoming our resident HTWB poet … this time on how you can still have fun way into your nineties. Rock on!

Why ‘doing it’ can still be fun

why doing it can still be fun

Jumping off the wardrobe isn’t wise. Yet, with a decent parachute …

The sixties and the seventies
When having sex was such a whizz
Were times we felt alive and filled our senses.
We had the pill but not yet AIDS,
Our one concern was getting laid,
Clothes off, to bed and blow the consequences [Read more…]

Bubbles for the weekend…

Your weekend smile … another delightful poem by retired GP (Family Doctor) Andrea Kingston. Enjoy!

funny poem about champgane

So I gave up and found a new glass, With enough champagne in it to last…

Bubbles

It seems I’ve mislaid my champagne
(Yes I’ve been down the garden again)
The last time ‘twas seen
Was a space wide and green
But both lawns seem quite clear, in the main [Read more…]

Are you a graduate looking for a job? Some advice from a clued-up cohort

Please welcome our new columnist Yasmin Mattocks, recently in the job market after graduating from University with an English degree. In this article she shares her experiences and advice to anyone in similar circumstances…

Life after graduation: advice from an English graduate  

Graduating from university is really envisioned as the ultimate goal for a lot of students, and so it should be: it is an achievement which deserves to be celebrated. However, after you finally receiving a mere piece of paper awarding you your degree, it may dawn on a lot of graduates that their years of fun are all finally over and they don’t know what to do, or even worse, they can’t get a job.

article about graduates finding jobs

“It has taken me months to come to terms with the realities of life after graduation…”

I know that for me it felt like a bit of an anti-climax, overshadowed by unemployment, after years of thinking I would come straight out of university and bag a well-paying job. Following my graduation in the midst of a pandemic and an economic crisis, I and many other graduates have found ourselves in a bit of a sticky situation. [Read more…]

Poem for a hot summer day

I’ve lost my gin in the greenhouse

by Andrea Kingston

Please welcome Andrea Kingston, a retired GP (family doctor) who volunteers with me in our local cancer group and – it turns out – is also a talented and hilarious poet! Here is one of hers I particularly enjoyed…

I’ve lost my gin in the greenhouse
Well goodness, gracious me!
As the glass is green
It remains unseen
And I’m thirsty don’t you see?

funny poem about lost gin

“Where’s my gin? I’m still in the greenhouse.”

[Read more…]

Loving Our Language: Indo-European languages and where they come from

As we all write in English, it’s great to find out more about the language in depth! Welcome to a new mini-series here on HTWB by Senior Transcriber Neil Wright – an avid expert on historical linguistics. This week Neill looks at where Indo-European languages come from. Over to Neil…

‘Indo-European’ languages might not sound similar to you, but linguists have scratched their heads over the apparent similarities of the Indo-European languages for centuries. Today, huge swaths of populations covering most of Europe, Asia Minor, and northern India speak languages that are so similar in construct, they must have had a single progenitor tongue.

article about Indo-European languages

Scientists and linguistics are closing in on the true origins of the Indo-European languages. Shown above: the flag representing Indo-European languages. Source: Wikimedia Commons

One of the very first people to draw the dots together was a man named William Jones in 1786. He was serving as a judge in British India at the time. Jones was a well-educated man, and had studied Greek and Latin, as well as English in school. Not long after arriving in India, he began to take an interest in Sanskrit — the language of the ancient religious texts — and wrote the following: [Read more…]

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