What to blog/vlog about at this time of year

One of my former copywriting colleagues was having a good old bitch earlier on Messenger about not having ideas for their next blog. I hit the roof.

illustration to article abut winter festivals

Autumn/fall and winter are a great time for festivals – and allied blogging.

“There’s so much to blog about at this time of the year, you could write one a day from now until New Year’s and not cover the same topic twice,” I rattled off on the keyboard chipping my newly-polished nails.

Use event dates not as blog topics, but as topic triggers

Let’s go back a few weeks (save those for next year) and check what there has been, as well as what’s to come before we pop the corks for New Year’s 2020. Here are just a few topics that can be triggered by associations with some of the world’s special days, and I know these ideas will trigger some more for you. [Read more…]

‘We pride ourselves…’ popular or pompous?

Now, small businesses, it’s time for your seasonal bottom-smacking from Suze for writing pompous ‘we-wee’ content that fools no-one and just makes you look like old fuddy-duddies.

Meet Sir Fuggled Doublebottom, a righteous Pompous Ass from Great Lakes Brewery on Vimeo

Yeah, OK, you pride yourselves. But do your clients/customers care?

I know, it’s cruel. [Read more…]

Why even one grammar mistake could cost you your new job

All you need is a recruiter or employer who has a bee in their bonnet about grammar, spelling, punctuation and so-on…if your CV/résumé contains one or more mistakes, you are toast.

writing tips from Suzan St Maur
So are your job prospects with that employer.

Unfair? [Read more…]

How to write with a tomato

Do you do Pomodoro? Yes, it’s Italian for tomato, but also it’s biz-speak for a productivity-increasing method. We writers like to think we can use methods like this to crank out the words faster. (Or do we?)

Pomodoro for writers

It’s named after a timer that looks like a tomato. Not exactly romantic, but it has caught on.

So we asked business admin expert Jean Weir to give us the skinny on how this technique works. And then we asked some other writers what they think about writing with tomato …

Over to Jean… Sz 

What is the Pomodoro technique from a writer’s point of view?

[Read more…]

Tricky, tricky spelling quiz: can you crack it?

I can’t afford to offer a trip for two to Las Vegas as a prize, but this quiz could keep you busy during quiet moments in the next few days. Answers at the bottom. (No cheating – look later!)

spelling mistakes

What do you feel are the most common wrongly spelled words in English?

And what really is infuriating is the way that simple spelling mistakes tend to creep in only because our own ‘word blindness’ – especially when we are writing extensively for business or other occupations – is largely to blame for our errors.

(That, and the fact that the English language has fewer rules to help us than a dog has when choosing which tree to pee on.)

Never mind: let’s have a laugh with the following:

Find the spelling mistake (or two, or none!) in the following:

[Read more…]

Grammar: do you write ESTs when they should be ERs?

It’s not exactly the end of the world, but did you know if you only have two children you don’t have an ‘oldest’ or ‘eldest?’

writing tips
(Or a ‘youngest,’ for that matter.) Everyone today seems to forget that the suffix ‘est’ should only be used when writing/talking about more than two items, people, etc. If it’s just two, the suffix is ‘er.’ And by the way…

‘Elder-eldest’ or ‘older-oldest?’
According to Merriam Webster, ‘elder’ and ‘eldest’ are only
used to refer to persons, whereas ‘older’ and ‘oldest’ are
used to refer to both persons and things.
More on the
detail of that here if you’re interested! [Read more…]

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