Blogging: the evergreen business favourite – on your own site

When you think that the first ever blog post was written nearly 25 years ago, it makes you wonder why this genre of communication hasn’t been killed and cremated along with many other online comms notions that have bitten the dust since those early years. Why not?

It's good to blog on your own website

Do we still need to bang the drum about blogging on your own website or blogsite?

Well, you know how I love to bang the drum about blogging and how it’s the best way since sliced bread for you to get both traffic and SEO brownie points for your website…could be that’s why blogging is still going strong. Here’s how to make sure it stays strong for you… [Read more…]

How to write for millennials

For the second time in a week, please welcome back the intrepid Jackson Rawlings. Last time he told us, er, older types in no uncertain terms how not to write for millennial audiences, and this week shares some further thoughts on we can do it right – if we want to be on the same wavelength. Pin back your ears (or eyes, anyway…) Sz x

Article on writing for millennialsI often get asked about the how to approach writing for millennials. Most likely because: a) I’m a writer and b) I’m a millennial. Makes sense, huh?

People ask me “should I write short pieces? Should I use jokes and memes?”

First of all, no. Or at least, probably no.

The assumption is writing for millennials is an entirely different game to writing for other audiences.

[Read more…]

How to use abstracts to introduce your blogs in social media

Assuming you don’t post full-length articles directly on to social media (and that’s not normally a good idea unless they’ve been published on your website first) how do you let your readers know when you’ve just posted something new?Using abstracts to introduce blog postsAnd more to the point, how do you entice readers to click through and read your full article on your website/blog?

Introduce your blog posts on social media using abstracts

[Read more…]

How NOT to write for millennials

I am so thrilled to welcome back our favourite young columnist here on HTWB, the one and only Jackson Rawlings who now writes for much posher publications including Huffington Post and Medium. Here, though, he gives us old goats some sharp, short advice on how not to write to and for millennials…take heed, those born before 1980! Sz x

lauren-peng-43963-unsplashI happened to catch the end of a TV soap the other day. I’m not someone who usually indulges in that kind of show, but on that occasion, my interest was piqued.

There were a couple of characters on screen who would be what I’d describe as millennials — probably in their mid-twenties — having a conversation with each other, which went something like this:

“Oh my god I can’t believe he said that, it’s like when “celebrity” did “celebrity thing” and I was like “what?”

“I know right? Hashtag fail”.

I’m paraphrasing from memory, but trust me, the actual scene was equally awful and stilted. [Read more…]

My children’s book was published last year and isn’t selling. What now?

If you’ve recently published a book and despite all your marketing efforts (and those of your publisher if you have one, although their contribution often is minimal) … it’s not selling well, what do you do?

Children's book not selling what can I do

You don’t need to spend much – if anything – to market and sell your book.

Hmmmm. A lot depends on what you mean by “publisher.”

As many of my readers already know, there are publishers, and then there are publishers. And then there is self-publishing and hybrid publishing and even today, there are still a few vanity publishers around.

Especially if you’re new to the publishing scene, this article will give you a brief overview of the options available now. And if you want to know more about the potential pitfalls, have a look here[Read more…]

Writing to connect people: doing digital introductions

It’s easy when you’re connecting people face-to-face: “Mary (Person A), I’d like you to meet John Smith (Person B) from Diddlycom – they’re the new educational software people here in town. “John, this is Mary Jones, who’s a senior lecturer in IT at our local technical college. I thought you two might have some interesting things to talk about.”Writing to connect people: doing digital introductions

You help get the conversation going, then back off, leave them to it and continue networking at the event, meeting, workshop or other activity. Sometimes, though, Person B in the story isn’t there – yet you feel sure that to connect them with person A would be a good idea for both parties. You agree with A to put them in touch with B which might turn into a useful, symbiotic relationship for them.

What do you do when all you’ve got to connect people with is a screen?

[Read more…]

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