Are you a graduate looking for a job? Some advice from a clued-up cohort

Please welcome our new columnist Yasmin Mattocks, recently in the job market after graduating from University with an English degree. In this article she shares her experiences and advice to anyone in similar circumstances…

Life after graduation: advice from an English graduate  

Graduating from university is really envisioned as the ultimate goal for a lot of students, and so it should be: it is an achievement which deserves to be celebrated. However, after you finally receiving a mere piece of paper awarding you your degree, it may dawn on a lot of graduates that their years of fun are all finally over and they don’t know what to do, or even worse, they can’t get a job.

article about graduates finding jobs

“It has taken me months to come to terms with the realities of life after graduation…”

I know that for me it felt like a bit of an anti-climax, overshadowed by unemployment, after years of thinking I would come straight out of university and bag a well-paying job. Following my graduation in the midst of a pandemic and an economic crisis, I and many other graduates have found ourselves in a bit of a sticky situation. [Read more…]

Loving Our Language: Indo-European languages and where they come from

As we all write in English, it’s great to find out more about the language in depth! Welcome to a new mini-series here on HTWB by Senior Transcriber Neil Wright – an avid expert on historical linguistics. This week Neill looks at where Indo-European languages come from. Over to Neil…

‘Indo-European’ languages might not sound similar to you, but linguists have scratched their heads over the apparent similarities of the Indo-European languages for centuries. Today, huge swaths of populations covering most of Europe, Asia Minor, and northern India speak languages that are so similar in construct, they must have had a single progenitor tongue.

article about Indo-European languages

Scientists and linguistics are closing in on the true origins of the Indo-European languages. Shown above: the flag representing Indo-European languages. Source: Wikimedia Commons

One of the very first people to draw the dots together was a man named William Jones in 1786. He was serving as a judge in British India at the time. Jones was a well-educated man, and had studied Greek and Latin, as well as English in school. Not long after arriving in India, he began to take an interest in Sanskrit — the language of the ancient religious texts — and wrote the following: [Read more…]

How have we become so selfish? An 18-year-old writes about coronavirus

by James Tierney

Please welcome James Tierney, 18, a highly talented young writer who hopes to make writing his career. His current projects include excellent fiction for children and young adults: this time, however, I asked him to share his nonfiction thoughts on the coronavirus pandemic from the point of view of a teenager in the UK. Over to James…Sz.

Now can you see the benefits of being tech-savvy, as we young people are?

At first, I couldn’t believe what I was hearing. It is like something you see in the movies.

Some sort of disease and no one is allowed to go out.

However, as the days have gone by the realisation has hit home. At first, they were saying it was only the elderly that were affected. As time has gone on, I have heard more cases of people around my age, or even younger, getting it and dying from it.

I think the worst of these was the 13-year-old boy who died from the coronavirus. [Read more…]

Diary of a social distancer: a bitchy email answer that felt GOOD

You know how much I loathe these shysters who write essays for students to cheat with? Here’s an approach I got today (yesterday by the time you see it!), along with the reply I sent.

From: Erin Milligan <erin.millligan@gmail.com>
Sent: 25 March 2020 16:55
To: Suze <suze@suzanstmaur.com>
Subject: Resource Update For Your Website

Hello,
My name is Erin Milligan and I just came across your website and noticed that my service can be useful for your audience.

You know how much I ‘love’ these sleaze-bag companies that help students cheat…

I work with EssayOnTime Company… [Read more…]

Why even one grammar mistake could cost you your new job

All you need is a recruiter or employer who has a bee in their bonnet about grammar, spelling, punctuation and so-on…if your CV/résumé contains one or more mistakes, you are toast.

writing tips from Suzan St Maur
So are your job prospects with that employer.

Unfair? [Read more…]

Writing with dyslexia: how to write faster without touching anything

“Do you wish you could type faster?” asks Neil Sleight from Talking Typist, who makes a welcome return to HTWB to bring us up to date on yet more improvements to voice recognition software (VRS) since his last article two years ago.

article about dyslexia

Voice recognition software like Dragon: a Godsend for dyslexic students, writers and business owners?

I was pretty rude about VRS at the time because being a) non-tech and b) impatient I found it clunky and disobedient. This was Dragon, the software Neil works with.

“You may have explored the possibility of using Dragon and if you found it frustrating,” Neil tells me, “it’s well worth having another look because it is now even faster and more accurate. And with a little practice it’s a huge help for people with dyslexia.” First, a user’s view…Sz

Experience of writing with VRS, as a dyslexic student and business owner

[Read more…]

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