Email: how to make your signature file work harder

Are those few lines that appear just below your name on your emails working as hard for you as they could?

Email: how to make your signature file work harder

Provided that your business or other activity offers verbally expressed advice and other help, it shouldn’t be hard for you to carve out, say, 10 top tips that you could include in your signature file.

In the spirit of sharing value to clients, prospects and others, here’s an idea that might work for you and your business, charity or other activity… [Read more…]

How to write for millennials

For the second time in a week, please welcome back the intrepid Jackson Rawlings. Last time he told us, er, older types in no uncertain terms how not to write for millennial audiences, and this week shares some further thoughts on we can do it right – if we want to be on the same wavelength. Pin back your ears (or eyes, anyway…) Sz x

Article on writing for millennialsI often get asked about the how to approach writing for millennials. Most likely because: a) I’m a writer and b) I’m a millennial. Makes sense, huh?

People ask me “should I write short pieces? Should I use jokes and memes?”

First of all, no. Or at least, probably no.

The assumption is writing for millennials is an entirely different game to writing for other audiences.

[Read more…]

How to use abstracts to introduce your blogs in social media

Assuming you don’t post full-length articles directly on to social media (and that’s not normally a good idea unless they’ve been published on your website first) how do you let your readers know when you’ve just posted something new?Using abstracts to introduce blog postsAnd more to the point, how do you entice readers to click through and read your full article on your website/blog?

Introduce your blog posts on social media using abstracts

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Writing to connect people: doing digital introductions

It’s easy when you’re connecting people face-to-face: “Mary (Person A), I’d like you to meet John Smith (Person B) from Diddlycom – they’re the new educational software people here in town. “John, this is Mary Jones, who’s a senior lecturer in IT at our local technical college. I thought you two might have some interesting things to talk about.”Writing to connect people: doing digital introductions

You help get the conversation going, then back off, leave them to it and continue networking at the event, meeting, workshop or other activity. Sometimes, though, Person B in the story isn’t there – yet you feel sure that to connect them with person A would be a good idea for both parties. You agree with A to put them in touch with B which might turn into a useful, symbiotic relationship for them.

What do you do when all you’ve got to connect people with is a screen?

[Read more…]

My grammar is cr*ppy. Should I correct it as I go along, or leave that to later?

When you’re writing, do you correct any goofs as you go along, or do you go for it “hell for leather” and worry about cleaning up goofs later?
This is something that we writers argue about until blue in the face, but shouldn’t. Why? Everyone is different. (Yeah, that one.)

crappy-grammar-when-to-correct
The purists amongst us usually insist that you should not obstruct your creative flow in its initial stages with such banal things like grammar, spelling, punctuation, syntax and so-on.

No, no, say those purists. You should free-write to get your creative “juices” working (yikes, how I hate that word – makes me think of molten perspiration pumping out body odour). Yuk.

So let’s start at the beginning… [Read more…]

If you spam in English, FFS learn how to write it first

Do you spit fur and feathers when you get a spam-mail that insults your website’s performance … in bad, incorrect English? I do. I know I should just hit the delete key but these people’s conceited belligerence brings out the Taurean beast in me, as well as my writer’s indignancy at their often ridiculous use of our crazy language.

If you spam in English, FFS learn how to write it first

Do yourselves a favour: hire a native English language copywriter to rewrite your mailshots so at least some English speakers might take you seriously.

Jenny finds my website “very perspective” and it could soon disappear from search

Our Jenny Jones works for a company called Semalt.com, based in the Ukraine (or maybe Russia.) Here’s how she thought she could bully me into submission, notwithstanding the fact that her English is laughable… [Read more…]

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