How to research for your nonfiction book (or other project)

The first port of call in any nonfiction book’s research journey must always be the book’s potential readers. By knowing these people well and understanding their issues and problems, you may even find that the book’s structure and content suggest themselves. So how do you go about it?

how to research for a nonfiction book

Start at your desk with some common sense.

There’s no great mystique to it. If you want to get to know your readers, simply go and talk to them. That’s what I do. But I don’t always follow the most obvious route. [Read more…]

Poem for a hot summer day

I’ve lost my gin in the greenhouse

by Andrea Kingston

Please welcome Andrea Kingston, a retired GP (family doctor) who volunteers with me in our local cancer group and – it turns out – is also a talented and hilarious poet! Here is one of hers I particularly enjoyed…

I’ve lost my gin in the greenhouse
Well goodness, gracious me!
As the glass is green
It remains unseen
And I’m thirsty don’t you see?

funny poem about lost gin

“Where’s my gin? I’m still in the greenhouse.”

[Read more…]

Trying to write and sweat at the same time…

If you’re working from home and do not benefit from the rewards (hopefully healthful) of working in a fully airconditioned office building, right now during COVID-19 issues anyway … have a read. I sympathise. And right at the bottom is a suggestion to take a leaf out of our Canadians’ book…

SWEET, SWEATY SUMMER

It’s 34 degrees outside
Perfect for dear old Dubai
But western Bedfordshire’s not quite
So suited to such temps that high.

I open all my windows up
Expecting cooler air to share
Oh, “wrongeroonie” I exclaim
It’s f***ing hellish-hot out there!

funny poem about working during a heatwave with no air conditioning

As I sweat and look just ghastly, I think back to babyhood…

[Read more…]

How writing a business book leads to a priceless marketing tool

.
Having a book published” still holds a certain kudos and perhaps in Pavlov-dog fashion, people automatically associate someone who writes a book about something, with that someone being an expert on the subject.

The “$30 business card” gets people recognised as experts, even if they don’t deserve to be.

In the USA, one prolific speaker on business topics has been heard to describe his books – which he self-publishes – as “$30 business cards.” Cynical perhaps, but the folklore about the author of a book being an expert in his/her field is crystallised therein. However…..

article about writing business books

Business books: just $30 business cards?

[Read more…]

Enjoying your Zoom meetings? Really?

Much as we owe many of our small (and bigger) businesses’ survival to the likes of Zoom, MS Teams and other platforms during this Coronavirus pandemic, some meetings are more successful than others.
.
funny poem about zoom meetingsHere’s a short, sharp ode to the less-than-comfortable type, attended by a group consisting mainly of women… (probably in the public sector)

The not-so-good Zoomie

It’s ten to nine and nearly time
For this morning’s Zoomie
Rush to put some makeup on
So I don’t look too mushroomie.

Put a bra on – flippetty-flop
Spray the hair with fumies
Put on top from dear Top Shop
And find some fresh joggeroomies. [Read more…]

Loving Our Language: Indo-European languages and where they come from

As we all write in English, it’s great to find out more about the language in depth! Welcome to a new mini-series here on HTWB by Senior Transcriber Neil Wright – an avid expert on historical linguistics. This week Neill looks at where Indo-European languages come from. Over to Neil…

‘Indo-European’ languages might not sound similar to you, but linguists have scratched their heads over the apparent similarities of the Indo-European languages for centuries. Today, huge swaths of populations covering most of Europe, Asia Minor, and northern India speak languages that are so similar in construct, they must have had a single progenitor tongue.

article about Indo-European languages

Scientists and linguistics are closing in on the true origins of the Indo-European languages. Shown above: the flag representing Indo-European languages. Source: Wikimedia Commons

One of the very first people to draw the dots together was a man named William Jones in 1786. He was serving as a judge in British India at the time. Jones was a well-educated man, and had studied Greek and Latin, as well as English in school. Not long after arriving in India, he began to take an interest in Sanskrit — the language of the ancient religious texts — and wrote the following: [Read more…]

css.php