Is your new book’s content already on Google?

If readers can find easily, on Google, all or most of the information you intend to write in your book, don’t bother writing the book.

book content on Google

Can most or all of your book’s information be found on Google?

This is a somewhat hard lesson we authors have to take on board, but here it goes: if you want your book to sell make sure it offers readers a lot more than they could find just by searching for the information on Google or other search engines.

I had the painful experience recently of looking into the production of an “A to Z” book of terms for two particular audiences, clearly defined. All seemed clear and cracking until that “Oh No” moment hit me: why should people buy this book containing umpty-dump hundred entries when all they need to do to find out what any of those terms those mean, is to key them into Google?

Similarly I tested an eBook about wedding speeches with advice that covered everyone who possibly could be included in anyone’s wedding party. Great idea, right? Wrong. Sales were poor, and after a bit I understood why: people due to give a wedding speech aren’t interested in what other speakers will be talking about at the wedding.

In your research, don’t just focus on the right general readership: look at the right individual book buyer 

Readers in the case above are only interested in their own role. And of course, each role in terms of wedding speeches is catered for very thoroughly in endless online articles and tutorials.

Fortunately I didn’t have to spend anything to find this out; just produce a PDF document myself and offer it for sale via sales portals like E-Junkie.com. Bear this in mind when you’re thinking about that book you want to write and how to research different angles and approaches.

Of course there are exceptions – usually in terms of books (especially printed ones which allow readers to make notes and highlight key passages more easily) providing a more useful medium for reading and learning. But think hard and refine your topic so that it can’t be supplanted by the gobs of info-by-the-yard/metre out there already.

How to write a book that Google can’t possibly compete with

book content on Google

Make sure your book offers what Google and its cohorts can’t

An example of how to refine your topic came up in a discussion I had with a client when I was helping her with developmental structuring of her book, which was a collection of different processes that help in a variety of health requirements. I raised the point that when looking at each process individually, readers could easily find them on Google or other search engines.

However what Google (or any other books on that topic at the time, anyway) could not provide was a means of comparing each of the processes with and against each other, and rating them against a set of criteria made up of each reader’s personal needs.

That was a light bulb moment for my client and as I write this she is busily typing away…!

Punchline: make sure your book only contains information people can’t find easily (or at least quickly) on the internet

Make sure your book solves readers’ problems in a way that the search engines can’t, or at least can’t without their having to search for hours.

Good luck and happy writing!

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