Search Results for: job search

The Write Way to Get a Job: using Twitter

 

The Write Way to Get a JobUsing Twitter … despite its being restricted to 140 characters or less … is a very useful part of your job hunting process. These tips show you how to make the most of it…

It’s increasingly hard to get a job – and a good one – these days, and although there is a lot to consider when you’re looking to get a job, effective business writing plays a major part in helping you succeed. In this series, HTWB columnist Lynn Tulip from Assessment4Potential explains the best ways to express your career information in your CV/résumé.

And if you want to catch up on all the earlier articles in the series, just check out the sidebar to the the right > > > > and they’re all there for you to help yourself.

Here’s Lynn…

How Twitter can support your job search

Not everyone embraces Twitter. However if you are  Internet savvy and able to spend time online then it is worthwhile creating an active account to support your job hunting and secure the job of your dreams.

(NB: As you probably know the # (hashtag) symbol is used to mark keywords or topics in a Tweet.)

Advice and guidance are as follows:

Create a professional Twitter background page, with a sensible avatar (user alter ego/character) and personal summary.

Your personal summary should include KEYWORDS that are relevant to your job search and your situation.

Include a link to an online webpage where your CV can be viewed

Use your twitter feed to comment and contribute as an expert, share your job search and ask questions.

Build relationships with people you know, your network and recruiters. Use them wisely and offer support and ideas.

Follow #Tweetmyjobs  and  look on their website http://tweetmyjobs.com/ They offer a free service for job hunters.

Use http://tweettabs.com/   or http://www.twellow.com/ to search for HR professionals and recruiters> Use keywords such as executive search, sourcing,  talent management etc to search within your industry and location.  You can then search the different profiles and follow interesting people.

Sign up for RRS feeds from Jobsites  and http://www.twithire.com/

Get listed in http://justtweetit.com/ . You can expand your choices and network so you are linking with others who have shared interests.

Do not ignore the benefits of searching using the hashtag (#) and abbreviations like NAJ or HAJ; also words like job, hiring, employment.

Tweet out positive messages. “Looking for an opportunity…” reads better than “Wondering whether to have another glass of … ”

Be honest, open and act with integrity at all times. Employers do not want surprises.

Follow @Microjobs – a profile set up to link recruiters and job seekers.  Depending on your sector and location you might find it a useful connection.  They do not follow you back.

There will be a number of Twitter accounts that are dedicated to job listings in different sectors, locations, and more. If you specify your own criteria you can get alerts to your phone or e-mail and be amongst the first to receive notifications.

I cannot repeat enough that job hunting is seriously hard work, and very time-consuming. Investing time and strategy in social media needs a foolproof plan. Used in combination with networking and building strong connections it could prove to be the most successful addition to your job search strategy and genuinely help you find eligible job opportunities, interviews and securing you your new job.

Let us know of your experiences in using Twitter and other social media for your job hunting … which approaches you’ve used and how they changed your chances!

The write way to get a job

Lynn Tulip from Assessment4Potential

Watch out for more of Lynn’s tips next week…

Now: let’s make sure  you get that job…

“Get That Job” by Lynn Tulip … The art of successful job hunting (print, Kindle)
“Can’t Get That Job?” by Lynn Tulip … Seven killer CV mistakes that destroy your chance of job success (print, Kindle)
“How To Write About Yourself” by Suzan St Maur … how to make the most of yourself, whatever you need to write INSTANT DOWNLOAD now available!

The Write Way to Get a Job: using Google Plus

 

The Write Way to Get a JobUsing Google Plus … despite its being newer than the other main social-business networking platforms  … is a very useful part of your job hunting process. These tips show you how to make the most of it…

It’s increasingly hard to get a job – and a good one – these days, and although there is a lot to consider when you’re looking to get a job, effective business writing plays a major part in helping you succeed. In this series, HTWB columnist Lynn Tulip from Assessment4Potential explains the best ways to express your career information in your CV/résumé.

And if you want to catch up on all the earlier articles in the series, just check out the sidebar to the the right > > > > and they’re all there for you to help yourself.

Here’s Lynn…

Can Google Plus support your job search?

Google Plus is now very much up and running, and far from being the newbie on the net it is catching up fast with numerous ideas on how to job search.  As with Facebook, Twittter and LinkedIn, Google Plus has many characteristics that are about sharing contacts and exchanging comments.  However, because it is Google and I have already stressed the importance of having a web presence it is a good idea to understand how Google Plus can help your job search.

Google Plus has the advantage of allowing you to keep your social life separate from your professional life.

This means you control who sees what in your profile and updates.  It is therefore possible to include potential employers in your circles so you are visible to them.

The other difference with Google Plus is that you can facilitate a conversation with strangers in an acceptable way.  If you mark your post ‘public’ then other users on Google Plus can contribute without feeling intimidated.  Indeed public comments may well be welcome.

Here are some top tips for using Google Plus

Be clear about your goal in using Google Plus.  Is it social or professional?  Your aim might be to be in a circle that is not just ‘contacts’ but perhaps ‘friend’.

Ensure that for professional purposes your profile is not only complete and up-to-date but also focused on professional talk.

Identify the sector, industries and companies who you will want to target and research the leaders. Add a comment to their post without including them in a circle.

Add value to the conversation/s when you follow a comment. Once there is a quality post, add your comments, +1 the post and circle the person to increase your visibility and chances of being noticed.

Build the relationship, watch for job opportunities and private message the individual when you feel the relationship has developed with genuine dialogue.

Once you have shared circles with your new friend, you should be in a  position to share with them and their circles that you are looking for a new role and ask if they know of any opportunities.

Remember that recruiters are also using Google Plus and building their own circles. For them it is the ease of sourcing high calibre candidates.  Hence there is plenty of opportunity to use Google Plus as part of your job search.

Let us know of your experiences in using LinkedIn for your job hunting … which approaches you’ve used and how they changed your chances!

The write way to get a job

Lynn Tulip from Assessment4Potential

Watch out for more of Lynn’s tips next week…

Now: let’s make sure  you get that job…

“Get That Job” by Lynn Tulip … The art of successful job hunting (print, Kindle)
“Can’t Get That Job?” by Lynn Tulip … Seven killer CV mistakes that destroy your chance of job success (print, Kindle)
“How To Write About Yourself” by Suzan St Maur … how to make the most of yourself, whatever you need to write INSTANT DOWNLOAD now available!

The Write Way to Get a Job: using LinkedIn

 

The Write Way to Get a JobUsing LinkedIn is a very useful way to job hunt, but you need to understand how it works in order to make your pitch effective. These tips show you how to achieve that…

It’s increasingly hard to get a job – and a good one – these days, and although there is a lot to consider when you’re looking to get a job, effective business writing plays a major part in helping you succeed. In this series, HTWB columnist Lynn Tulip from Assessment4Potential explains the best ways to express your career information in your CV/résumé.

And if you want to catch up on all the earlier articles in the series, just check out the sidebar to the the right > > > > and they’re all there for you to help yourself.

Here’s Lynn…

LinkedIn as part of your Job Search Strategy

Here’s a question for you:  Should anyone working or not working have a profile on LinkedIn?

True or False?

Certainly if you are a current job seeker you need to have a profile on LinkedIn and you need to be using the site appropriately. LinkedIn is where companies want to be when they are recruiting and where job seekers should be when they are job searching.

If you are actively job searching then you need to think of all the preparations you have made already, your CV, personal presentation and research and ensure that it is collated and uploaded to your LinkedIn profile.

You need to present yourself positively to both prospective employers and networking contacts.

Make sure there is a current and appropriate photograph on your profile

Ensure that your CV and work history are achievement focused, complete, and include relevant key words and skills.

Be creative when writing your professional headline, for example:

  • “… Professional seeking work”
  • “Experienced …. available for new opportunity”
  • “Representative currently exploring new opportunities”
  • “….Consultant in transition”
  • “Graduate seeking entry level programming position”

Add recommendations, testimonials and references where you can, as these add value.

Use the Answers section to pose or respond to relevant questions within your field of expertise.

Join Groups on LinkedIn, and participate in them.  Chose groups not only for their professional value but also the locality.  Contributions and comments are all useful.

Build your Network (selectively) The more connections you have the more opportunities are available.

Use the Search option (top right of menu) Search Jobs and Companies for opportunities as well as researching who is recruiting and where people are moving to and from. It is easy to trace career histories with LinkedIn so use the facility and your connections wisely.

Stay connected. Having a strong network helps at all times, it can be as comforting as job security.

Make sure you are open to all opportunities and that you use LinkedIn for developing not only network contacts but also real researched job opportunities. It is a very valuable resource.

Let us know of your experiences in using LinkedIn for your job hunting … which approaches you’ve used and how they changed your chances!

The write way to get a job

Lynn Tulip from Assessment4Potential

Watch out for more of Lynn’s tips next week…

Now: let’s make sure  you get that job…

“Get That Job” by Lynn Tulip … The art of successful job hunting (print, Kindle)
“Can’t Get That Job?” by Lynn Tulip … Seven killer CV mistakes that destroy your chance of job success (print, Kindle)
“How To Write About Yourself” by Suzan St Maur … how to make the most of yourself, whatever you need to write INSTANT DOWNLOAD now available!

The Write Way to Get a Job: using Facebook

 

The Write Way to Get a JobUsing Facebook is not the most obvious way to job hunt, but used correctly it can be very effective. These tips show you how to make the best of it…

It’s increasingly hard to get a job – and a good one – these days, and although there is a lot to consider when you’re looking to get a job, effective business writing plays a major part in helping you succeed. In this series, HTWB columnist Lynn Tulip from Assessment4Potential explains the best ways to express your career information in your CV/résumé.

And if you want to catch up on all the earlier articles in the series, just check out the sidebar to the the right > > > > and they’re all there for you to help yourself.

Here’s Lynn…

Facebook as part of your Job Search Strategy

Facebook has a major part to play when you are job hunting.

Whilst LinkedIn is still the primary professional networking site that recruiters are using to source candidates, Facebook and Google+ are catching up fast.

There is a wealth of talent on these sites and you need to be part of that talent.

Facebook currently attracts graduates and students. However, there is also a section for executives as well.  See http://www.facebook.com/groups/brancheout/docs/

Remember your privacy settings. Ensure that these are set appropriately and that content on your Facebook pages is suitable for potential employers to view.

How to use Facebook as a resource

Once again it is about setting a strategy and reminding yourself  of your  goals. With Facebook it may be to look for the right employer.

  • Employers will set up their own company pages so your strategy is to research the sector, industry and company and then ‘Like’ their business pages.
  • Engage with the company and add value to their wall. Ask questions and offer positive comments.
  • Facebook is more entertaining and active than LinkedIn so if you are actively updating your status, ensure that it is suitable.
  • Companies can showcase their business with video, pictures, advertisements for jobs and testimonials for FREE. These tools allow them to show the Facebook community what a great company they are and how attractive they would be as an employer.
  • Facebook has a large audience and the members who ‘Like’ certain business pages become a target market. Be prepared to receive their e-communications.
  • Facebook ‘feeds’ and ‘Like’ buttons make integration easier. Company branding is becoming more prominent.
  • Facebook is an open network with no fees charged at any level. You can have access to all the content to help in your job search.
  • Recruiters may use LinkedIn for networking, screening and recruiting but they are using Facebook for brand activities and talent communication.

As a starting point, Facebook is a great place for employers to start looking for bright new talent. For you, the job seeker, it is a great place to position yourself within the talent pool.

The more proactive you are the more influential you become and more opportunities become available.

Let us know of your experiences in using Facebook for your job hunting … which approaches you’ve used and how they changed your chances!

The write way to get a job

Lynn Tulip from Assessment4Potential

Watch out for more of Lynn’s tips next week…

Now: let’s make sure you get that job…

“Get That Job” by Lynn Tulip … The art of successful job hunting (print, Kindle)
“Can’t Get That Job?” by Lynn Tulip … Seven killer CV mistakes that destroy your chance of job success (print, Kindle)
“How To Write About Yourself” by Suzan St Maur … how to make the most of yourself, whatever you need to write INSTANT DOWNLOAD now available!

The Write Way to Get a Job: 9 top tips on using the internet

 

The Write Way to Get a JobUsing the internet is an obvious necessity when you’re job hunting, but if you want it to be genuinely helpful for you, it’s not as simple as it looks. These tips show you how to make the best of it…

It’s increasingly hard to get a job – and a good one – these days, and although there is a lot to consider when you’re looking to get a job, effective business writing plays a major part in helping you succeed. In this series, HTWB columnist Lynn Tulip from Assessment4Potential explains the best ways to express your career information in your CV/résumé.

And if you want to catch up on all the earlier articles in the series, just check out the sidebar to the the right > > > > and they’re all there for you to help yourself.

Here’s Lynn…

1.Look into relevant employment news and discussion groups. Members are very supportive of each other and most are willing to help answer questions. Remember to respect the rules established by the group. Do not just lurk but participate! With hundreds or thousands of readers you have an uncomplicated way to network.

2.If you only look at advertised positions on the Internet you will miss the vast majority of openings.

3.If you are not sure how to use the many resources ask a professional to explain. Do not ask for information you could find on your own through printed or other sources, though – it won’t reflect well on your initiative skills!

4.Be sure you ask the right person the right question.

5.If you want help from a discussion group on the Internet, look for their archives or FAQs, (frequently asked questions) section first because your answer may be there. When submitting a question write in complete sentences with good grammar with no words that people from other cultures may not understand.

6.Asking for help on the Internet can result in assistance or annoyed feedback, depending on how you phrase your request.

7.Mention that their assistance or suggestions would be appreciated. Offer to compile the replies you receive and pass them back to the group.

8.Etiquette dictates that you should ask people to help you find information rather than give you the information. Make sure your name and e-mail address are available at the bottom for people to get back to you. Thank each person who replies to you.

9.Job searching is the same online as off. Be professional in your writing, in contacting employers through e-mail, and in following up on contacts you make as well as requests made by employers. If you wish to terminate contact with an employer because you are no longer interested in that job or organisation, send another e-mail, thanking the employer for any consideration given to you, and declining further interviews (or whatever stage you are at). Keep their goodwill: you may want to initiate contact again in the future.

Let us know of your experiences in using the internet for your job hunting … which approaches you’ve used and how they changed your chances!

The write way to get a job

Lynn Tulip from Assessment4Potential

Watch out for more of Lynn’s tips next week…

Now: let’s make sure you get that job…

“Get That Job” by Lynn Tulip … The art of successful job hunting (print, Kindle)
“Can’t Get That Job?” by Lynn Tulip … Seven killer CV mistakes that destroy your chance of job success (print, Kindle)
“How To Write About Yourself” by Suzan St Maur … how to make the most of yourself, whatever you need to write INSTANT DOWNLOAD now available!

The Write Way to Get a Job: how to be found online

 

The Write Way to Get a JobAn essential part of your job search: making sure your online presence is perfect…

It’s increasingly hard to get a job – and a good one – these days, and although there is a lot to consider when you’re looking to get a job, effective business writing plays a major part in helping you succeed. In this series, HTWB columnist Lynn Tulip from Assessment4Potential explains the best ways to express your career information in your CV/résumé.

And if you want to catch up on all the earlier articles in the series, just check out the sidebar to the the right > > > >  and they’re all there for you to help yourself.

Here’s Lynn…

CV Keywords are essential for all job hunters

Keywords are not just for websites. They are essential for job hunters and their CV too. Your CV needs to include keywords that are relevant to the role you want and the experience you have. Uploading your CV so recruiters can find you is one of the key actions for job hunters, but making sure it is found by recruiters is another important tactic.

For job seekers, the keywords that matter are the words and phrases a recruiter uses whilst searching, like the words you type into Google or other search engines  when you are looking for something.

So what keywords should you use?

The answer to that challenging question has to be “use keywords that apply to you and your experience.”

Initially your priority is to prepare an internet-compatible CV, which can also be used on your profile on LinkedIn (see later in this series of articles).

To do this you need to ensure you have included keywords throughout your CV.

Revisit the CV you are going to use for online submissions. Remember to tailor the CV if you are responding to a specific role.  If you are uploading your CV to job sites then this section is equally relevant.

Top Tips – Keywords on your CV:

Use nouns with their descriptive adjectives – don’t sidestep or omit the action words and power language. However you now need to focus on the job title and roles that the recruiter will be searching for.

Pick up job descriptions of job roles that you want and identify the keywords of nouns and noun phrases that are relevant and make sure that you are able to include them in your own CV.

Brainstorm keywords for your CV by developing a long list of possibles.

Ideas for Keywords for your CV

  • Your next job title, standard job titles and non-standard job titles
  • Names of job specific, industry specific and profession specific tools that you can use because of your education and experience
  • Software and hardware resources and unique techniques that you are qualified to use
  • Professional and technical acronyms
  • Include your qualifications, education establishments and certifications
  • ‘Name drop’ about conferences and publications where you have demonstrated your expertise
  • Include both the acronym and the phrase in your CV to increase probability of keywords being found

Be inconsistent – yes, don’t worry about language to the same extent as you would if you were presenting your CV in person.  Example: MBA; M.B.A.; Master of Business Administration; Masters in Bus. Admin. This is all about keywords for your CV and being found on line. You do not know what exact term the recruiter will use.

Add a section at the top of your CV entitled Key Skills (or similar) and include the best collection of keywords that are phrases that sum up your experience, job history and expertise.

Always ensure that your uploaded CV is named appropriately. Example: CV Lynn Tulip Career Management Resumé.doc

Finally make sure that your CV is aligned with your LinkedIn profile. Keywords are equally vital on social media sites to ensure that you are discovered and you create your best opportunities.

Let us know of any keywords you find work well for you … which ones you’ve used and how they changed your chances!

The write way to get a job

Lynn Tulip from Assessment4Potential

Watch out for more of Lynn’s tips next week…

Now: let’s make sure  you get that job…

“Get That Job” by Lynn Tulip … The art of successful job hunting (print, Kindle)

“Can’t Get That Job?” by Lynn Tulip … Seven killer CV mistakes that destroy your chance of job success (print, Kindle)

“How To Write About Yourself” by Suzan St Maur … how to make the most of yourself, whatever you need to write (PDF download)

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