The Write Way to Get a Job: words that will get you found online

The Write Way to Get a JobIt’s increasingly hard to get a job – and a good one – these days, and although there is a lot to consider when you’re looking to get a job, effective business writing plays a major part in helping you succeed. In this series, HTWB columnist Lynn Tulip from Assessment4Potential explains the best ways to express your career information in your CV/résumé…here’s Lynn…

Relevance and keywords

Now you have already decided on where you are going to target, which companies in certain locations and which roles you are interested in; you can think about including keywords in your CV.

Keywords are not just for websites. They are essential for job hunters and their CV too.  Your CV needs to include keywords that are relevant to the role you want and the experience you have.

CV keywords are essential for all job hunters

Uploading your CV so recruiters can find you is one of the key actions for job hunters, but making sure it is found by recruiters is another important tactic.

For job seekers, the ‘keywords’ that matter are the words and phrases a recruiter uses whilst searching, like the words you type into Google or other search engines,  when you are looking for something.

So what keywords should you use?

The answer to that challenging question  has to be “use keywords that apply to you and your experience”

Importance of keywords

Initially your priority is to prepare an Internet compatible CV, which can also be used as on your profile on LinkedIn (see later in this series).

To do this you need to ensure you have included Keywords throughout your CV.

Do this:

Revisit the CV you are going to use for online submissions. Remember to tailor the CV if you are responding to a specific role.  If you are uploading your CV to job sites then this section is  equally relevant.

Top Tips – keywords on your CV:

  • Use nouns with their descriptive adjectives – don’t sidestep or omit the action words and power language. However you now need to focus on the job title and roles that the recruiter will be searching for
  • Pick up job descriptions of job roles that you want and identify the keywords of nouns and noun phrases that are relevant and make sure that you are able to include them in your own CV
  • Brainstorm keywords for your CV by developing a long list of possible keywords.

Ideas for keywords for your CV

  • Your next job title, standard job titles and non-standard job titles
  • Names of job specific, industry specific and profession specific tools that you can use because of your education and experience
  • Software and hardware resources and unique techniques that you are qualified to use
  • Professional and technical acronyms
  • Include your qualifications, education establishments and certifications
  • ‘Name drop’ about conferences and publications where you have demonstrated your expertise
  • Include both the acronym and the phrase in your CV to increase probability of Keywords being found
  • Be inconsistent – yes, don’t worry about language to the same extent as you would if you were presenting your CV in person. Example: MBA; M.B.A.; Master of Business Administration; Masters in Bus. Admin. This is all about keywords for your CV and being found on line. You do not know what exact term the recruiter will use.
  • Add a section at the top of your CV entitled Key Skills (or similar) and include the best collection of keywords that are phrases that sum up your experience, job history and expertise.
  • Always ensure that your uploaded CV is named appropriately. Example: CV Lynn Tulip Career Management Resumé.doc
  • Finally make sure that your CV is aligned with your LinkedIn profile. Keywords are equally vital on social media sites to ensure that you are discovered and you create your best opportunities.

Let us know what keywords you think work well … which ones you’ve used and how they changed your chances!

The write way to get a job

Lynn Tulip from Assessment4Potential

Watch out for more of Lynn’s tips after the Holidays…

Now: let’s make sure  you get that job…

“Get That Job” by Lynn Tulip … The art of successful job hunting (print, Kindle)

“Can’t Get That Job?” by Lynn Tulip … Seven killer CV mistakes that destroy your chance of job success (print, Kindle)

“How To Write About Yourself” by Suzan St Maur … how to make the most of yourself, whatever you need to write (PDF download)

The Write Way to Get a Job: power phrases to get you noticed

The Write Way to Get a JobIt’s increasingly hard to get a job – and a good one – these days, and although there is a lot to consider when you’re looking to get a job, effective business writing plays a major part in helping you succeed. In this series, HTWB columnist Lynn Tulip from Assessment4Potential explains the best ways to express your career information in your CV/résumé…here’s Lynn…

When you’re compiling your CV/ résumé you need to use strong, powerful words that resonate with readers so they feel your strength and confidence. It’s no good to say I “did” this or I “worked on” that; employers want to know that you contributed a lot more than a passing interest to your achievements. Last week we looked at more than 250 powerful verbs and adjectives that add spice and vitality to your CV / résumé.

Now, here are some more words or phrases that could be useful in collating information for your CV and interview preparation.  They may help you identify some of your achievements and activities but should not be used in your CV:

  • Cost cutting
  • Making something look better
  • Improving appearance
  • Increasing sales/profit/turnover
  • Providing extra information
  • Providing service above your job description
  • Gaining the commitment and support of others
  • Turning a bad situation around
  • Preserving competitive advantage
  • Having initiative
  • Presenting solutions to problems
  • Introducing new systems
  • Improving team work and relations
  • Working well under pressure
  • Having new, workable ideas
  • Paying attention to details
  • Avoiding potential problems
  • Organising
  • Using old things in a new way
  • Meeting deadlines easily
  • Reducing inventories
  • Developing staff performance

Convincing CV-building words and phrases

These are examples of buzz words and phrases you can use on your CV to describe key skills and activities.

Achieving
Actioning
Advising individuals
Analysing
Arranging social events
Assembling

Building

Calculating numerical data
Checking for accuracy
Classifying records
Coaching individuals
Commissioning
Communicating
Compiling figures
Contacting
Co-ordinating
Corresponding with customers
Counselling

Data gathering
Decision making
Delegating
Designing
Developing
Directing
Dispensing information
Documenting
Drafting reports
Driving
Editing documents
Encouraging
Establishing

Fact-finding
Fitting

Handling complaints

Influencing
Initiating
Inspecting
Instructing
Interpreting data
Interviewing
Investigating

Leading
Liaising
Listening
Machining
Maintaining records
Making
Managing
Mediating between people
Mentoring
Monitoring
Motivating others

Negotiating

Observing
Obtaining
Operating equipment
Optimising
Organising people and work

Perfecting

Persuading others
Planning Agendas
Preparing charts or diagrams
Presenting
Problem solving
Programming Computers
Promoting events
Protecting Property

Raising funds
Recording data
Rectifying
Repairing
Researching
Reviewing
Running meetings

Selling
Serving the public
Setting up demonstrations
Shaping
Speaking in public
Summarising
Supervising staff

Teaching
Telephoning
Testing
Training
Trouble shooting

Visualising

Writing

Let us know what other power phrases you think work well … which ones you’ve used and how they changed your chances!

The write way to get a job

Lynn Tulip from Assessment4Potential

Watch out for Lynn’s tips next week…

Now: let’s make sure  you get that job…

“Get That Job” by Lynn Tulip … The art of successful job hunting (print, Kindle)

“Can’t Get That Job?” by Lynn Tulip … Seven killer CV mistakes that destroy your chance of job success (print, Kindle)

“How To Write About Yourself” by Suzan St Maur … how to make the most of yourself, whatever you need to write (PDF download)

The Write Way to Get a Job: the right information to write into your CV-résumé

The write way to get a jobIt’s increasingly hard to get a job – and a good one – these days, and although there is a lot to consider when you’re looking to get a job, effective business writing plays a major part in helping you succeed. In this article, HTWB columnist Lynn Tulip from Assessment4Potential explains the best way to express your career information in your CV/résumé…here’s Lynn!

In the last article I showed you how to structure your CV/résumé, so now I will show you how to write the content to go into the structure.

The SIX basic elements of your CV should be:

Heading

Firstly, ensure that your personal details are spelled correctly – this is your heading for your CV!

Identifying information should head the first page in a balanced, pleasant layout. This should include your name, address, telephone numbers and email address.

You may wish to have this information on the right-hand side of the page, making it readily visible to someone flipping through a pile of CVs.

Your objective or personal profile

If you feel it is appropriate, include your job objective. It can be a very strong selling point for the reviews if your objective clearly states:

  • That you want to do the type of job you are applying for
  • The reasons you want to do the job
  • The match between the job and your own skills and experience
  • What you can contribute to the role

However, if your objective does not match the job you are applying for, it is much better to omit it.

Included here are the reasons why your past experience has qualified you to do this job – why you can do what your objective stated you want to do.  This should be a short paragraph or one-liner, such as:

“Four years managerial experience running a major store for a national supermarket chain”

Alternatively, a positioning statement describing you and your skills in up to three sentences can nicely summarize your employability.

Achievements/results

This part of the CV could also be entitled Related Achievements or Professional Accomplishments. The purpose of this section is to present results that further support your objective or application for this particular job.  This section should contain lots of demonstrable facts and works particularly well when formatted into bullet points.  For each bullet point:

  • Identify the problem or situation
  • Use action verbs to define what you did
  • Identify what the results of your actions were
  • Illustrate the significance of the achievement in quantifiable terms, e.g. money, people, percentages, if possible.

Two examples of these are:

“Planned and built a new workshop facility for a property developer, ahead of schedule, with significant savings in projected construction costs”

and

“Managed and promoted a local fundraising campaign for a national charity that provided contributions exceeding £50,000, three times the previous record”

Make sure that the achievements strongly and directly support your job objective or your specific job application.

If you would prefer not to list your achievements separately, it is also acceptable to list them under each relevant job title (see Experience, below.)

Experience

The fourth part of the CV covers your employment history.  Using the term Experience makes a more positive statement.

Remember that a CV is a marketing/promotional tool and only those things that enhance your strengths should be included, whilst anything that would detract should be omitted.  Never be tempted to falsify any information on a CV – it just doesn’t work, and seriously jeopardizes others’ perception of your integrity.

This section should first state:

  •  Your most recent job title
  • The name of the company
  • Location
  • Dates employed.

Then give a brief job description, emphasizing the strengths that support your objective.  If you have not listed your achievements in a separate section, you should include them under each relevant job title.

When listing your jobs:

  • Do not give total number of months or years, or provide month-specific dates; this would set up an “is all the time accounted for?” mentality that would detract from the attention given to your accomplishments
  • Do not give reasons for leaving jobs, as this also detracts from your achievements in each role
  • Do not go into too much detail about each company’s business, as the CV reviewer wants to read about your achievements, not the company’s operation
  • Do not provide details of positions held more than ten to fifteen years ago; simply summarize the nature of this early experience, showing how you have progressed in your career, for example:
“Twelve years in positions of increasing responsibility in project management” 

Education

Educational background should be stated simply:

Highest Degree/Qualification First

  • Subject
  • Establishment
  • Dates
  • Prior Degrees/Qualifications

Secondary education should also be shown. Whilst (in the UK) it is useful to give A-level subjects, it is acceptable to just to number the GCSEs/O-Levels you have gained, rather than name each specific subject.

Other training, certificates, or educational attainments should also be shown if they provide significant support to your objective.

Other relevant data

This section is optional. It can include memberships, language skills and personal data that support your objective. Most CV reviewers like to see some indication of extra-curricular activities.  However, you should normally leave out of your CV explicit indications of religious affiliation, political orientation or controversial activities.

For the vast majority of jobs, in most industrialized countries you are under no obligation to state your age/date of birth, gender, any disability and marital or family status as these do not directly affect your ability to do the job. You must decide for yourself whether or not to include this information. Your consultant will be able to discuss this with you in more detail.

The write way to get a job

Lynn Tulip from Assessment4Potential

Watch out for Lynn’s tips next week!

Now: let’s make sure  you get that job…

“Get That Job” by Lynn Tulip … The art of successful job hunting (print, Kindle)

“Can’t Get That Job?” by Lynn Tulip … Seven killer CV mistakes that destroy your chance of job success (print, Kindle)

“How To Write About Yourself” by Suzan St Maur … how to make the most of yourself, whatever you need to write (PDF download)

The Write Way to Get a Job: the ideal structure for your CV-résumé

The write way to get a jobIt’s increasingly hard to get a job – and a good one – these days, and although there is a lot to consider when you’re looking to get a job, effective business writing plays a major part in helping you succeed. In this article, HTWB columnist Lynn Tulip from Assessment4Potential shows you the ideal structure for your CV…here’s Lynn!

Before you start deciding on WHAT to include in your CV/résumé it’s essential that you first know how to structure it.

Here, then, is a skeleton outline of how to put your CV/résumé together, before you start filling in the various different sections.

Emily Jones
Address
Telephone number                                      E-mail address

Objective

(A statement of the proposed outcome of your job search. This could also be entitled background summary – this should support your objective by stating why you can do what your objective states you want to do.)

Achievements

(This deals with achievements or professional accomplishments  – the purpose of this section is to present results, which further support the strengths cited in the objective.)

Experience

Job title                Company employed at                Dates of employment
(One or two lines to give a brief overview of the company and department you worked for. This puts your role in context. Outline your main responsibilities giving examples of achievements that support the objective in bullet point format)

* Responsible for day-to-day running of ______________

* Completed ____________

* Recommended ______________

Job title                Company employed at                Dates of employment
(Etc. – continue this format for each of your positions, starting with the most recent.)

Education

(Start with your highest qualification in the following format:)
HND Marketing and Communications          Kingston College, Surrey      1993
A Levels:  History, English, French                 St. Mary’s School, Uxbridge  1991

Personal Details

(In this section you can include personal details including language skills, professional memberships etc.)

REMEMBER: A MAXIMUM OF TWO PAGES IF POSSIBLE

The write way to get a job

Lynn Tulip from Assessment4Potential

Watch out for Lynn’s tips next week, on how to fill in these sections. In the meantime, you could be thinking about what you could include here in your new CV/résumé!

Now: let’s make sure  you get that job…

“Get That Job” by Lynn Tulip … The art of successful job hunting (print, Kindle)

“Can’t Get That Job?” by Lynn Tulip … Seven killer CV mistakes that destroy your chance of job success (print, Kindle)

“How To Write About Yourself” by Suzan St Maur … how to make the most of yourself, whatever you need to write (PDF download)

The Write Way to Get a Job: how to go about writing your CV

The write way to get a jobIt’s increasingly hard to get a job – and a good one – these days, and although there is a lot to consider when you’re looking to get a job, effective business writing plays a major part in helping you succeed. In this article, HTWB columnist Lynn Tulip from Assessment4Potential tells you how to go about writing your CV the right way…here’s Lynn!

Now it is down to some serious work. You have to imagine yourself as a small business; how are you going to attract business and what are your customers likely to come to you for, or will you look for them?

You are looking for your next employer and your next employer may also be looking for you!

So – ask yourself – just as I am reluctant to buy anything without seeing it first, so I may not get my next job without someone seeing me first.  If my promotional literature fails to attract then I may not get a second opportunity to make a good impression in person.

Your CV is YOUR promotional literature

It is not a confessional box nor is it a life history. It promotes you.

  • What you have to Offer?
  • What you have Done?
  • What you have Achieved?

Is your CV working FOR YOU, or against you?

The most important thing to remember is that your CV has only one objective

And that is to get YOU an interview.

It is your personal advertisement and the message must be clear and easily understood.  Don’t expect the reader to “read between the lines” or spend too much time reading it.

Go for IMPACT – get yourself in the selection pile, invited for interview and BE SEEN.

You need to tell others what YOU have to offer.

YOU are the product,  the CV is the advertisement selling the product.

The write way to get a job

Lynn Tulip from Assessment4Potential

CV Presentation

A prospective employer will give more attention to your CV if it is pleasant to read and easy to select the relevant information from.  It is also your first chance to make a good first impression.

When writing your CV take into account the following guidelines in order to ensure it is given the attention it deserves:

  • Your CV should be produced in one of the more “standard” fonts, such as Arial, Verdana, Tahoma, or Times New Roman
  • Use a medium sized font (10 to 12)
  • Do not be tempted to try and cram more on to a page through the use of a smaller font as this makes a CV difficult to read
  • For the same reason, ensure that you have spaced the CV appropriately. It is easier to find information on a well-spaced CV.  Make use of headings, new lines, paragraphs and bullet points to separate the information you give into useful chunks for the reader
  • Do not use too wacky a format or any wild colours
  • Maximum length of a CV is 2 pages single side printed

Even taking this advice into consideration you must ensure that you know something of the requirements and expectations of the person to whom you are sending your CV and use your discretion accordingly.

For certain roles, or with certain companies, you will need to adapt these guidelines.  For example, if you are applying for a particularly creative role, then it may be a good idea to use creative fonts and colours…

Watch out for Lynn’s tips next week!

Now: let’s make sure  you get that job…

“Get That Job” by Lynn Tulip … The art of successful job hunting (print, Kindle)

“Can’t Get That Job?” by Lynn Tulip … Seven killer CV mistakes that destroy your chance of job success (print, Kindle)

“How To Write About Yourself” by Suzan St Maur … how to make the most of yourself, whatever you need to write (PDF download)

The Write Way to Get a Job: 10 top tips to make your CV stand out from the crowd

The write way to get a jobIt’s increasingly hard to get a job – and a good one – these days, and although there is a lot to consider when you’re looking to get a job, effective business writing plays a major part in helping you succeed. In this article, HTWB columnist Lynn Tulip from Assessment4Potential gives you a checklist of ten elements you need to make sure your CV stands out…here’s Lynn!

Your CV MUST be eye-catching, believable, factual, relevant, original, have impact, be well laid out, easy to read, match the market and sell the benefits.

Here are 10 Top Tips to make your CV stand out from the crowd.

1.YOUR CV must be interesting to the reader: it is first impressions that count. Use plenty of space and wide margins: the visual layout is important.

2.The CV should always be typed. Use contemporary, readable fonts.

3.Avoid the use of “I” and use Action words.  For example, bullet point your achievements so they read:

  • Provided full-time care for……
  • Completed project within ….

4.Always give employment details in reverse order.  Recent employment is always most relevant. Your employer wants to know who you are now and not what you were ten years ago.

5.CVs take time. The more thought you give, the greater the chance of success. Adapt your CV every time to suit the particular positions you are applying for.

The write way to get a job

Lynn Tulip from
Assessment4Potential

6.Too much detail is better than not enough, although nobody wants your autobiography!

7.Remember your CV has the potential to determine the interview questions

8.Your CV is your promotional literature. Don’t be too modest; potential employers need to know how good you are. If you don’t tell them on your CV they may never find out.

9.Never list references or salary details. If they are requested include them in your covering letter.

10.DON’T FORGET YOUR ACHIEVEMENTS: always quantify them whenever you can.

Watch out for Lynn’s tips next week!

Now: let’s make sure  you get that job…

“Get That Job” by Lynn Tulip … The art of successful job hunting (print, Kindle)

“Can’t Get That Job?” by Lynn Tulip … Seven killer CV mistakes that destroy your chance of job success (print, Kindle)

“How To Write About Yourself” by Suzan St Maur … how to make the most of yourself, whatever you need to write (PDF download)

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